AALL 2018 Recap: Education Committee Meeting – Program Planning for DC

capitol

By: Loren Turner

The FCIL-SIS Education Committee met at the crack of dawn (7:00 am) on Tuesday, July 17th to begin brainstorming and strategizing for the AALL 2019 conference in Washington, D.C.  We were joined by two members of the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC), Sabrina Sondhi (our official FCIL liaison to the AMPC) and Alyson Drake.  Sabrina and Alyson shared the AMPC’s timeline for gathering program ideas and proposals.  Alyson will be writing a separate DipLawMatic blog post that covers the AMPC’s timeline and goals in more detail, but in a nutshell, there is a two-step process for us to get some FCIL-related programming into the DC conference: (1) submit and up-vote your undeveloped, wild and crazy ideas to the Ideascale platform (from now until August 17th) and (2) submit your developed, professional program proposals to the AMPC (Labor Day-ish until October 1).

We have an excellent location for the next conference and the Georgetown folks who joined our meeting are already on-the-ball with fab ideas on international taxation, international trade, and international human rights.  What about you?!  What programming do you want to see in D.C. for your professional development?

Dennis Sears (searsd@law.byu.edu) and I (lturner@umn.edu) would L.O.V.E. to hear from you!  Tell us what you want to learn.  Tell us what you want to teach. Tell us who you know and what they might offer.  We will do your cold-calls.  We will help craft your wild and crazy ideas into fully-developed programs (or pre-conference workshops). We need you to help us create substantive FCIL programming for the AALL 2019 conference.  Let’s do this.

AALL 2018 Recap: Impostor Syndrome: The Plague (or Good Fortune) of the Smart Professional

By Jennifer Allison, FCIL Librarian, Harvard Law School Library

This program was presented by Cynthia Bassett (University of Missouri), Kristyn Seo Taff (University of Minnesota), and Kenneth Hirsh (University of Cincinnati).

impostorsyndrome

Image via Medium.com

People who suffer from “Impostor Syndrome” are generally “high achievers who are afraid to be unmasked.”  Can you relate?  You probably can if you can claim any of the following:

  1. You believe that successes you experience in your life are due to luck, timing, or computer error.
  2. You feel compelled to minimize your accomplishments by saying things like, “If I can do it, then anyone can.”
  3. You feel crushed when you receive constructive criticism.
  4. You tend to agonize over every single one of your “flaws.”
  5. You honestly think that it’s only a matter time that everyone will find out that you are a complete fraud.

This program sought to “throw some light” on the negative feelings that characterize Impostor Syndrome, because they “live and thrive in darkness.”

According to the literature, as many as 70% of people suffer from Impostor Syndrome, from creative types to successful business people.  Despite the common belief that it predominantly affects women, men also suffer from its effects.

To better illustrate how Impostor Syndrome manifests itself, the speakers presented the following five archetypal categories:

  • Perfectionist:
    Constantly worried about measuring up, a perfectionist is a micro-manager who has trouble delegating tasks, sets insanely high marks to live up, and ruminates over situations that are not 100% perfect.
  • Superman/Superwoman:
    This category includes people who, because they are terrified that they have not earned their position or title, always stay late at the office, feel stressed when they are not working, and tend to sacrifice their hobbies and passions.
  • Natural Genius:
    A natural genius is a straight-A, gold star student who was always praised for being “the smart one.”  These people want to do everything perfectly the first time, avoid challenges, and dislike having a mentor.
  • Rugged Individualist:
    People in this category don’t like to ask for help and want to accomplish everything on their own.
  • Expert:
    These are people who feel that they tricked their employers into hiring them – they never feel like they know enough, and they are constantly seeking additional training opportunities. They will never apply for a job unless they believe that they are 100% qualified for it – which they never really do.

Understanding how Impostor Syndrome impacts your life and behavior can be helpful to overcome its damaging effects, although it is important to not trend too far in the other direction.  The polar opposite of Impostor Syndrome is known as the Dunning-Kruger effect, in which incompetent people are extraordinarily confident, self-assured, and secure in their abilities, mainly because they fail to recognize their own incompetence.  A healthy, moderate dose of self-awareness can help in striking an appropriate balance between these two extremes.

Impostor Syndrome can affect anyone at any stage of his or her career and life, as the personal testimonials from each of the presenters illustrated.  Hirsh’s battle with Impostor Syndrome started when he became a law library director, and manifested itself as feeling that he had “lucked into his position.”  Both Seo Taff and Bassett spoke of their personal experience as law librarians who do not have law degrees.  Seo Taff, who has always been “a planner” and currently works as an access services librarian in an academic law library, has found herself on a career path that did not match her post-MLIS five-year plan, and is currently serving in her fourth professional position in three years, which appears to actually have worked out quite well for her.  Bassett, after eleven years in the profession, decided to go to law school because, even though she is a competent teacher of legal research, she “felt like a fraud” when the students asked her questions that she couldn’t answer.

So how can Impostor Syndrome be characterized as a provider of “good fortune?”  According to the presentation, it serves as an indicator that people are growing and moving into a space where they are becoming better versions of themselves.  This point had a profound impact on me personally.  I try to be an optimist, and I had to believe that Impostor Syndrome (which I have suffered from for years myself) is, in some way, also a force for good in my life.

So what are some strategies that we can use to overcome the negative effects of Impostor Syndrome?  The presenters offered the following suggestions:

  • Compare and despair – stop comparing yourself to others! That never accomplishes anything positive and just makes you unhappy.
  • Mindfulness – go outside and take a walk! Be aware of the feelings Impostor Syndrome awakens in you, and use them as a strategy to do something positive for yourself.
  • Invite it in – respond to feelings by accepting and not squelching them, and reframe the feelings so that they can have a positive impact.
  • Practice self-compassion, and treat yourself like you would treat a good friend.
  • Choose an affirmation – one of the panelists reported regularly repeating the phrase, “All is good in my world.”
  • Decide on your mission, and use your energy to further it, rather than undermine it.
  • Recast yourself – remove yourself from the situation and put your best friend in it instead. What would you say and do to provide comfort and encouragement?
  • Add sunlight – acknowledge the validity of your feelings.
  • Find a mentor – have someone you trust who you can talk to, and consider finding someone who is outside your organization and can be a bit more neutral.
  • Find your community, whether in affinity groups or in social media.

The program concluded with an exercise.  Everyone at each table wrote a statement about his or her experience with Impostor Syndrome on an index card, and then each person at the table read someone else’s card.  This was a really powerful experience, because it showed that none of us are alone in these feelings, no matter how much it seems like it.

After reflecting on the presentations and the exercise, I came up with a few more if my own strategies for battling the negative effects of Impostor Syndrome:

  • Focus on strengths rather than perceived weaknesses.
  • Minimize wasting time with pity parties.
  • Surround yourself with positive people.
  • Be brave – have the courage to eliminate self-doubt, negative self-talk, and feelings that you aren’t good enough. Even if you think they’re working for you, they’re not.
  • Fight perfectionism! Instead, get things done as well as you can, and then move on and enjoy your life.
  • Appreciate your intellect.

I have a feeling that Impostor Syndrome will always play a role in my own life.  However, after attending this program and journaling my thoughts about it, I feel a renewed sense of purpose and energy, and am looking forward to being better able to bolster myself when Impostor Syndrome reasserts itself in the future.

Final Call for Bloggers for AALL 2018 in Baltimore

Baltimore
DipLawMatic Dialogues is finalizing its coverage of the AALL Annual Meeting.  Please consider helping out your fellow law librarians who aren’t able to attend this year (or will be in Baltimore, but can’t attend everything they’d like to) by volunteering to recap a session of the program you’re already planning on attending!

So far, we’ve only had a few volunteers, so we’re looking for quite a few more, including covering some of the following FCIL-related programs:

  • Sunday, July 15th, 12:45-2:15pm:  Jewish Law “Lunch and Learn”
  • Monday, July 16th, 3:30-4:30pm: FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign and International Legal Research Interest Group

We are also looking for bloggers who are attending other programs/discussions dens not directly related to FCIL librarianship, but that may be of interest to our readers.  A few examples that stood out to us (but contact us with any other programs you’re interested in blogging):

  • Sunday, July 15th, 11:30-12:30pm: Should One Judge Have All This Power
  • Monday, July 16th, 10:00-12:30pm: Best Practices in Employee Management: Strategies for Building a Productive and Engaged Library Team
  • Monday, July 16th, 11:30-12:30pm: Don’t Just Hire the Best–Keep Them
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Changing Paths and Opening Doors: Transferring Skills Across Law Library Types and Sectors
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Teaching Tech
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 8:30-9:30am:  It’s All About Relationships: Marketing to Your Library’s Stakeholders
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 10:00-11:00am: Lightning Lessons: Research Instruction in a Flash
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 11:30-12:30pm: Setting Priorities, Meeting Deadlines, and Managing Projects for Law Librarians

We hope you’ll help us out!  Contact Alyson Drake (alyson.drake@ttu.edu) with any programs you’d be interested in recapping.

Second Call for Bloggers for AALL 2018 in Baltimore

DipLawMatic Dialogues is looking to continue our tradition of providing excellent coverage of the AALL Annual Meeting.  Help out your fellow law librarians who aren’t able to attend this year (or will be in Baltimore, but can’t attend everything they’d like to) by volunteering to recap a session of the program you’re already planning on attending!

So far, we’ve only had two volunteers, so we’re looking for quite a few more, including covering some of the following FCIL-related programs:

  • Sunday, July 15th, 12:45-2:15pm:  Jewish Law “Lunch and Learn”
  • Monday, July 16th, 12:30pm:  FCIL-SIS Book Discussion Group Meeting
  • Monday, July 16th, 3:30-4:30pm: FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign and International Legal Research Interest Group
  • Monday, July 16th, 4:45-5:45pm: FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians Recipient Presentation

We are also looking for bloggers who are attending other programs/discussions dens not directly related to FCIL librarianship, but that may be of interest to our readers.  A few examples that stood out to us (but contact us with any other programs you’re interested in blogging):

  • Sunday, July 15th, 11:30-12:30pm: Should One Judge Have All This Power
  • Sunday, July 15th, 2:30-3:30pm: Diverse Interactions: Addressing Race and Implicit Bias in Legal Research Instruction
  • Monday, July 16th, 10:00-12:30pm: Best Practices in Employee Management: Strategies for Building a Productive and Engaged Library Team
  • Monday, July 16th, 11:30-12:30pm: Don’t Just Hire the Best–Keep Them
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Changing Paths and Opening Doors: Transferring Skills Across Law Library Types and Sectors
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Teaching Tech
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 8:30-9:30am:  It’s All About Relationships: Marketing to Your Library’s Stakeholders
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 8:30-9:30am: 25 Free Technologies for Law Libraries
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 10:00-11:00am: Lightning Lessons: Research Instruction in a Flash
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 11:30-12:30pm: Training the Lawyers of Tomorrow Through the Clinics of Today: Three Models for Practical Library Services in Clinical Law School Settings and Beyond
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 11:30-12:30pm: Setting Priorities, Meeting Deadlines, and Managing Projects for Law Librarians

We hope you’ll help us out!  Contact Alyson Drake (alyson.drake@ttu.edu) with any programs you’d be interested in recapping.

Baltimore

Getting to Know the IFLP, Part III: Come See Us in Baltimore!

By Alyson Drake

IFLPIn this third installment of our series on Getting to Know the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals (IFLP or “the Index”), we’re extending an invitation to join us in Baltimore to learn more about the Index and the Advisory Board.  The IFLP Advisory Board will be in full force—and we’ve even got an exciting opportunity for chances to win prizes, including a one-year subscription to the Index.

So how can you get to know the Index better in Baltimore?

  • If you’re attending CONELL on Saturday, July 14th, stop by the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals table in the CONELL Marketplace and meet Marci Hoffman, General Editor of the Index, and Susan Gualtier, a member of the IFLP Advisory Board. They’ll be happy to tell you more about why the Index is an important resource and how one can eventually participate on the Advisory Board.  You can also enter our drawing at CONELL (see more on that below).
  • Join us at the IFLP Advisory Board on Saturday, July 14th, from 4:00-5:00pm in Hilton Douglass. We’ll be there to answer questions about the Advisory Board’s work and the Index.  We’ll also be having a working session to decide whether to add a few titles to Index—a great opportunity for those interested in serving on the Board someday to get an inside look at how the process works!
  • And now for the prizes! This year at AALL, we’ll be doing a game at the HeinOnline booth in the Exhibit Hall.  Answer a few quick questions (see this brochure and our last two posts on the Index to study up) and you’ll be entered to win a drawing for one of three prizes:
    1. One-year subscription to HeinOnline (need not be present to win and current subscribers can win the free subscription)
    2. Our IFLP Legal Eagle
    3. Geotze Caramels

We’ll draw the winners on Monday, July 16th at 1:30pm at the HeinOnline booth in the Exhibit Hall.  You must answer all questions correctly to win.

We’re looking forward to seeing you all in Baltimore!

FCIL-SIS Events and Call for Bloggers for AALL 2018!

BaltimoreHello, FCIL-SIS! We’re getting excited to see you in Baltimore in a few weeks!  As we approach the 2018 AALL Annual Meeting in Baltimore, we encourage you to keep an eye on the blog and to follow us on Twitter for coverage of FCIL-SIS programming both during and after the conference.

We’re also looking for volunteers to recap a program (or two). The recaps are a wonderful way to contribute to the FCIL-SIS community, as it allows those unable to attend the conference to get a snapshot of conference programming (and for those of us who rely on recaps posted in the blog archives to refresh our memories)!  If you are interested in volunteering to recap any of the FCIL-SIS related events listed below (especially the ones highlighted), please contact Alyson Drake (alyson.drake@ttu.edu).

FCIL Events

Sunday, July 15

●      7:30-8:45am: FCIL-SIS E-Resources Interest Group Meeting (Hilton Poe B)

●     12:45-2:15pm: Jewish Law “Lunch and Learn” (Hilton Key Ballroom 11)

●     1:00-2:15pm: FCIL-SIS Jurisdictions Interest Group Joint Meeting (Hilton Pickersgill)

●     5:15-6:15pm: FCIL-SIS Foreign Selectors Interest Group Meeting (Hilton Paca)

●      6:15-6:45pm: FCIL-SIS Standing Committees Joint Meeting (Hilton Marshall Board Room)

Monday, July 16

●   7:30-8:45am: FCIL-SIS Business Meeting Breakfast (Hilton Holiday Ballroom 1)

●      10:00-11:00am: Publicizing Faith or Privatizing Law? Researching Religious Arbitration and Private Dispute Settlement (BCC Room 318-19/321-22)    

●      12:30pm: FCIL-SIS Book Discussion Group Meeting (meet at the Registration Area)

●      3:30-4:30pm: FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign and International Legal Research Interest Group (Hilton Armistead). Marci Hoffman (co-author of International and Foreign Law Research: A Coursebook and Heidi Kuehl (co-author of International Legal Research in a Global Community) will be discussing their books respectively.

●      4:45-5:45pm: FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians Recipient Presentation (Hilton Carroll A). 2018 Recipient, Ms. Daniela Majorie Akama dos Reis, will be discussing Brazilian Law Librarianship with us!

●    6:00-7:00pm: International Attends Joint Reception (AALL/FCIL/IALL)  (Hilton Holiday Ballroom 1-2)

Tuesday, July 17

●   7:00-8:15am: FCIL-SIS Education Committee Meeting (7:00 am to 8:15 am, Hilton Calloway A)

●   10:00-12:30pm: FCIL Basics for Metadata Professionals: Collaborating to Ensure Access to Foreign and International Legal Materials (BCC Room 318-19/321-22)
We are also looking for bloggers who are attending other programs/discussion dens that might not be directly related to FCIL-SIS or international or foreign law, but that might be of general interest to our readership.  We are open to posts on any programs (just shoot us an email), but think the following might be of particular interest to our readers:

Sunday, July 15

●   11:30-12:30pm: Should One Judge Have All This Power? (BCC Room 341-342)

●   2:30-3:30pm: Diverse Interactions: Addressing Race and Implicit Bias in Legal Research Instruction (BCC Room 337-338)

●   2:30-3:30pm: Impostor Syndrome: The Plague (Or Good Fortune of the Smart Professional (BCC Room 318-319/321-322)

Monday, July 16

●  10:00am-12:30pm: Deep Dive: Best Practices in Employee Management: Strategies for Building a Productive and Engaged Library Team (BCC Ballroom I)

●  11:30-12:30pm: Don’t Just Hire the Best–Keep Them (BCC Room 327-329)

●  2:00-3:00pm:  Changing Paths and Opening Doors: Transferring Skills Across Law Library Types and Sectors (BCC Room 318-319/321-322)

●  2:00-3:00pm: Teaching Tech (BCC Ballroom I)

Tuesday, July 17

●   8:30-9:30am: It’s All About Relationships: Marketing to Your Library’s Stakeholders (BCC Room 318-319/321-322)

●   8:30-9:30am: 25 Free Technologies for Law Libraries: Second Edition (BCC Room 341-342)

●  10:00-11:00am: Lightning Lessons: Research Instruction in a Flash (BCC Room 327-329)

●  11:30-12:30pm: Training the Lawyers of Tomorrow Through the Clinics of Today: Three Models for Practical Library Services in Clinical Law School Settinsg and Beyond (BCC Room 339-340)

●   11:30-12:30pm: Setting Priorities, Meeting Deadlines, and Managing Projects for Law Librarians (BCC Room 324-326)

FCIL-SIS Book Discussion Group to Meet Again in Baltimore This Summer

By Susan GualtierKorematsu Cover

Over the past several years, the FCIL-SIS Book Discussion Group, started by Dan Wade in in 2014, has become a popular informal addition to the AALL Annual Meeting’s FCIL conference programming.  Each year, we select a book to read in advance of the conference and meet during the conference to enjoy a book discussion, lunch or snacks, and each other’s fine company.

This year, the group will meet on Monday, July 16, at 12:30.  As in past years, we will meet in the Registration Area, and will find a table or small room from there.  The event will be BYO lunch or snacks.

This year’s book selection is In the Shadow of Korematsu: Democratic Liberties and National Security, by Eric K. Yamamoto.  Professor Yamamoto is the Fred T. Korematsu Professor of Law and Social Justice at the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai`i. He is nationally and internationally recognized for his legal work and scholarship on civil procedure, as well as national security and civil liberties, and civil rights and social justice, with an emphasis on reconciliation initiatives and redress for historic injustice.  The following book description appears on the Oxford University Press website:

The national security and civil liberties tensions of the World War II mass incarceration link 9/11 and the 2015 Paris-San Bernardino attacks to the Trump era in America – an era darkened by accelerating discrimination against and intimidation of those asserting rights of freedom of religion, association and speech, and an era marked by increasingly volatile protests. This book discusses the broad civil liberties challenges posed by these past-into-the-future linkages highlighting pressing questions about the significance of judicial independence for a constitutional democracy committed both to security and to the rule of law. What will happen when those profiled, detained, harassed, or discriminated against under the mantle of national security turn to the courts for legal protection? How will the U.S. courts respond to the need to protect both society and fundamental democratic values of our political process? Will courts fall passively in line with the elective branches, as they did in Korematsu v. United States, or serve as the guardian of the Bill of Rights, scrutinizing claims of “pressing public necessity” as justification for curtailing fundamental liberties?

These queries paint three pictures portrayed in this book. First, they portray the present-day significance of the Supreme Court’s partially discredited, yet never overruled, 1944 decision upholding the constitutional validity of the mass Japanese American exclusion leading to indefinite incarceration – a decision later found to be driven by the government’s presentation of “intentional falsehoods” and “willful historical inaccuracies” to the Court. Second, the queries implicate prospects for judicial independence in adjudging Harassment, Exclusion, Incarceration disputes in contemporary America and beyond. Third, and even more broadly for security and liberty controversies, the queries engage the American populace in shaping law and policy at the ground level by placing the courts’ legitimacy on center stage. They address how critical legal advocacy and organized public pressure targeting judges and policymakers – realpolitik advocacy – at times can foster judicial fealty to constitutional principles while promoting the elective branches accountability for the benefit of all Americans. This book addresses who we are as Americans and whether we are genuinely committed to democracy governed by the Constitution.

This year’s book selection promises to foster a rich discussion, and we look forward to welcoming both past book group members and new members interested in joining the discussion.  Again, this is an informal event, and RSVPs are not necessary; however, please feel free to let us know if you are planning to participate, so that we can get a general head count ahead of time.  Any questions or comments can be emailed to Susan Gualtier at sgua@law.upenn.edu.  We look forward to seeing you all in Baltimore for another great book discussion!