Call for Bloggers: AALL 2020

we_need_you_shutterstock_570489691It’s that time of the year–when we ask for volunteers to recap programs of AALL sessions of interest to the FCIL-SIS community.  With many employers imposing freezes on conference travel and others not being able to attend, it’s a wonderful way to share some of what you’re learning with your FCIL-SIS colleagues. In addition to Annual Meeting recaps, there are two pre-conference workshops that have been transitioned into a series or webinars that we encourage you to attend and to recap:

First up is the FCIL-SIS Civil Law Workshop on Tuesday, July 21st, comprised of four not-to-be-missed sessions led by your FCIL colleagues:

  • 10:00am CST: Introduction to Civil Law Jurisdictions: Traditions, Origins, and Terminology, with Marylin Raisch
  • 11:00am CST: The Role of Codes in Mixed and/or Civil Jurisdictions: Historical Traditions and Modern Developments, with Olivier Moreteau
  • 12:00pm CST: The Role of Cases in Mixed and/or Civil Jurisdictions: Historical Traditions and Modern Developments, with Xavier Beauchamp-Tremblay
  • 2:00pm CST: A 90 minute “mock class” on research from a civil law perspective, in which panelists Jennifer Allison, Katarina Daniels, and Janet Kearney will focus on Germany, Quebec, and New Orleans.

Also of note is the Instructional Design for Law Librarians Workshop, spread out over three days from July 28 to July 30th. There are sessions on everything from backward design to designing learner-centric syllabi to best practices in instructional design for accessibility, including two sessions by FCIL-SIS members:

  • July 28th from 1:00-2:15pm CST: Instructional Design: Empowering Foreign LLM Students to Learn and Thrive, with Jennifer Allison
  • July 30th from 1:00-2:30pm CST: An Introduction to Evidence-Based Instruction: Using Cognitive Theory to Improve Your Teaching, with Alyson Drake

As always, we are happy to have recaps of any or all programs you’re attending, but we’ve identified a few other programs from the regular conference programming the FCIL-SIS community might be particularly interested in reading about in a recap. Unfortunately, speaker information is not available at the time of publication, but we will update once it is.

  • Tuesday, July 14th from 12:00-1:00pm CST: Race, Responsibility, and Revolution: Difficult Conversations and a Call to Action
  • Wednesday, July 15th from 10:30-11:30am CST: Working From Home: Lost in Space, Home Alone, or Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  • Wednesday, July 15th from 3:30-4:30pm CST: What the Japanese, the Swedes, and the Minimalists Can Teach Us About Legal Instruction
  • Thursday, July 16th from 12:00-1:00pm CST:  Fear and Loathing in Teaching Legal Research: Addressing Cultural Competence and Managing Implicit Bias
  • Thursday, July 16th from 3:30-4:30pm CST:  Law Library Neutrality in a Time of Political Upheaval

If you are interested in recapping any of the Annual Meeting or webinar sessions above or others not listed, please contact Alyson Drake or Jessica Pierucci.

IALL 2019 Recap: International Environmental Law in Australia

By Julienne E. Grant

Professor Tim Stephens spoke to attendees on the final day of the IALL conference, October 30, 2019. He is Professor of International Law at the University of Sydney; an Australian Research Council Future Fellow; and Deputy Director of the University of Sydney’s Marine Studies Institute. The topic of Professor Stephens’s excellent presentation was “International Environmental Law in Australia: Old Problems, New Challenges.”

Photo of Professor Tim Stephens.jpg

Professor Tim Stephens, Professor of International Law at the University of Sydney.

The professor began his talk by defining International Environmental Law (IEL). He said that it is a type of public international law that “seeks to conserve/manage natural and cultural/built environments.” He added that IEL is becoming increasingly important around the world and that it operates somewhat like the concept of equity.

Professor Stephens explained that IEL is predominately treaty-based; there are currently hundreds of such documents in force, with Australia being a party to more than forty multilaterals. The speaker explained, however, that treaties to which Australia is a party are not self-executing; that is, there is no automatic implementation, and only the Parliament of Australia can implement treaties. The professor indicated that the division between federal and state responsibilities is extremely complex in Australia, a fact that other conference speakers emphasized. Here, Professor Stephens cited the Tasmanian Dam Case” [1983] HCA 21, which radically expanded the power of the Australian parliament in external affairs. Overall, he said, the federal system has complicated Australia’s IEL commitments.

The speaker also indicated that the federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC), although designed for the purpose of environmental protection, is not working; the federal government has not taken the lead on environmental management, leaving this to the individual states. He said that the Great Barrier Reef, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is under significant environmental pressure; there is, for example, a coral “bleaching” problem, most markedly in the north part of the site. UNESCO, however, has not placed the Great Barrier Reef on its “In Danger” list yet.

The professor pointed out, though, that Australia has been a strong supporter of IEL overall, noting the country’s interest in protecting its unique species and biodiversity (he believes Australia is experiencing an extinction crisis with regard to both). He also noted that Australia brought a case to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in 2010, accusing Japan of breaching several of its obligations under the 1946 International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, as well as other international commitments to preserve marine mammals. Australia won the case (Australia v. Japan, decided March 31, 2014).

But the Australian government, Professor Stephens said, has taken an ambivalent stance on climate change because the country is a big user and exporter of fossil fuels. According to the speaker, there are weak emission targets in Australia, and the Clean Energy Future Act 2011 was repealed by the current government. He said that there are presently dozens of lawsuits in Australia related to climate change, and there is actually a separate Land and Environment Court in New South Wales (NSW). The current NSW government wants to override the federal “coal-friendly” administration. Gloucester Resources Limited (GRL) v Minister for Planning [2019] NSWLEC 7 has, however, changed the situation somewhat as dicta in that case suggests that climate change was a good reason to deny a construction permit for an open-cut coal mine. Professor Stephens called the language in that case “revolutionary,” as previously Australian courts did not look at anything related to IEL.

Professor Stephens concluded his lecture with the following thoughts:

  • IEL is being challenged significantly in the current geological era (Anthropocene), and we can expect to see a new round of IEL mechanisms;
  • Australian governments have generally been supportive of IEL treaties (but not always!);
  • Australia’s current federalist system has complicated its commitments to IEL;
  • The EPBC Act of 1999 has not been effective;
  • a new generation of environmental laws is needed in Australia, including a federal environmental act, monitored by independent institutions.

Overall, with regard to environmental protection, Professor Stephens believes that decision-making should be taken away from politicians and placed into the hands of scientists and other experts.

Professor Stephens’s PowerPoint slides for the presentation are posted on the IALL website.

IALL 2019 Recap: Australian Indigenous Peoples and the Law

By Meredith Capps

AustralianIndigenous

The panel at the Australian Indigenous Peoples and the Law program at IALL 2019.

On Monday, October 28th at 11:00 a.m., Thalia Anthony of the University of Technology, Sydney began the panel with her presentation titled Colonial Legal Histories and Indigenous Sovereignty.  Anthony described the concept of legal hybridity, and the historic tension between colonial jurisdiction and indigenous sovereignty.  She discussed the notion of ngurra-kurla embraced by the Warlpiri people, a philosophy embodying core elements of law land, law, language, skin, and ceremony, and how the Warlpiri utilize both compensation and shaming as punishment.  Recent policing of Warlpiri sacred sites in violation of its indigenous law provides an example of typical modern-day intracultural and intralegal conflicts.

Anthony discussed several significant Australian cases dealing with indigenous sovereignty, including:

  • R v Murrell (1836)–the Supreme Court of New South Wales (NSW) ruled that indigenous people are not “law-bearing people,” indigenous inhabitants subject to universal Anglo-Australian law;
  • Milirrpum v Nabalco & Cth (1971)–Supreme Court of the Northern Territories rejected a claim of native title;
  • Mabo v Queensland (No 2) (1992)–landmark decision of the High Court of Australia overturning Milirrpum, for the first time recognizing native title;
  • Walker v NSW (1994)–the High Court of Australia found that the legislature may pass general criminal statutes applicable to all persons;
  • Binge v Bennett (1988) & R v Buzzacott (2004)–NSW Supreme Court and Australian Capital Territory Supreme Courts dismissed concerns of racial bias in jury selection.

Anthony then discussed Australia’s incarceration of indigenous people, the most incarcerated group in the world.  Indigenous women currently represent Australia’s fastest-growing prison demographic.  Anthony characterized efforts to forcibly displace indigenous persons during the 18th century as “palliative carceralism” while in the 19th century, Australian authorities engaged in “protective carceralism,” asserting control over indigenous populations through missions and settlement.  Such efforts evolved into what Anthony characterizes as “welfare carceralism” and “penal carceralism.”  Indigenous communities are subject to a high level of policing on the streets, and greater levels of criminalization at each stage of the justice system (arrest, prosecution, and bail).  Indigenous young people are more likely to experience abuses such as torture while in police detention.  Despite efforts by the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, indigenous persons die at increasing rates while in police custody.  Anthony reemphasized that indigenous communities do not utilize prison as punishment, and highlighted the need for a hybrid domain embracing initiatives such as community courts and community justice reports.

In Protecting Indigenous Cultural Property, attorney Terri Janke described intellectual property protections for indigenous land, documentation, arts, and language.  She discussed international protocols such as the Negoya Protocol, WIPO provisions regarding traditional cultural expressions, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, which assert rights, but these rights do not automatically translate into domestic statutory law in Australia. Janke highlighted challenges common to protecting cultural history in different spheres.  Copyright, for example, does not protect content such as oral history, which does not exist in a fixed format.  In the patent realm, co-sharing agreements can provide a mechanism for protecting indigenous knowledge in medicinal use of plants.  Janke discussed a few notable cases dealing with indigenous cultural property, including Milpurrurru v Indofurn, in which indigenous artists prevailed in a copyright suit involving use of their art in woven carpets, Bulu v R&T Textiles, rejecting the idea of communal ownership of copyright but finding that the artist owed a duty to the indigenous group whose work he represented, and ACCC v Birubi Art Pty Ltd, penalizing Birubi for sale of fake indigenous art in souvenirs.

Finally, Magistrate Sue Duncombe presented NSW Circle Sentencing and the NSW Youth Koori Court.  59% of the juvenile detention population is indigenous, and the Youth Koori Court, awarded a $2.7 million, three-year government grant, hopes to address this imbalance.  Its goal is not necessarily to reduce recidivism, but to reduce risk factors for offending, and though some participants have reoffended, many participants now live independently, obtain employment, and maintain custody of children. Juvenile offenders accepted in the program will engage in a suitability exercise where they learn program expectations, including developing of their own action and support plans, and compliance with monitoring and reporting procedures.  At sentencing, punishments may not exceed those the youth would receive in the criminal justice system, and staff acknowledge and incentivize progress.

IALL 2019 Recap: Pre-Conference Workshop–An Introduction to the Australian Legal System and Legal Research

By David Isom

IALL 2019 Preconference Workshop.JPG

Larissa Reid and Fiona MacDowall present at the IALL Pre-Conference Workshop

This year’s IALL Annual Course Pre-Conference Workshop was titled “An Introduction to the Australian Legal System and Legal Research.” Held at the Parliament House of New South Wales on Sunday, October 27, the workshop was presented by Larissa Reid, Reader Services Manager at the New South Wales Law Courts Library of Sydney, and Fiona MacDowall, co-editor of the Australian Law Librarian. The workshop was as an excellent introduction to the law of Australia and a very helpful preparation for the sessions that followed. While I can’t do justice to the breadth and depth of their presentation in a summary of this kind, I have chosen to highlight those topics which I—as a non-Australian with little familiarity with the country’s history and legal system—found particularly valuable.

Reid and MacDowall began the workshop with an introduction to the Australian system of government and legal system. Australia remains a constitutional monarchy whose head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, represented locally by the Governor-General (currently David Hurley). It is a federal parliamentary democracy with a written constitution which took effect in 1901. Vast in area (just under three million square miles) but relatively small in population (slightly more than 25 million residents as of 2019), it consists of six states and two self-governing territories (as well as seven external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory).

The British colonizers of Australia applied the doctrine of terra nullius (“land belonging to no one”) to the land they settled—disregarding the Aboriginal peoples and their customary legal traditions—and established English law in Australia, making it a common law jurisdiction. Formal reception of English law began in 1828 in New South Wales (which then included what are now Queensland and Victoria) and Tasmania with the Australian Courts Act 1828 and continued in additional states and territories through 1911. After reception, any subsequent English legislation is inapplicable (though English common law was not fixed at such time). After reception, the Australian colonies had the authority to enact legislation of their own provided that it was not “repugnant” to the laws of England (under the Colonial Laws Validity Act 1865).

The passage of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 joined the six Australian colonies as “one indissoluble Federal Commonwealth under the Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.” Organized into eight parts, the Constitution establishes three branches of government: a Parliament (consisting of a House of Representatives and a Senate), the Judiciary, and the Executive Government. The Constitution gives Parliament the power to legislate in enumerated areas (including but not limited to defense; interstate and international trade; taxation; marriage and divorce; immigration; and bankruptcy); the states have power to make laws in all other areas. While it contains no bill of rights, the Constitution explicitly mentions five individual rights: the right to vote; protection against the Commonwealth’s acquisition of a person’s (or State’s) property on unjust terms; the right to a jury trial; freedom of religion; and a prohibition of discrimination based on a person’s state of residency. Amending the Constitution requires approval from Parliament and a nationwide referendum (which requires a “double majority”—approval of a majority of voters nationwide, as well as a majority of voters in a majority of states).

Australia has both Commonwealth courts and state/territory courts; the court of last resort for both is the High Court of Australia. For Commonwealth courts, the principal intermediate courts are the Federal Court and the Family Court, and the trial courts are the Federal Circuit Courts. States and territories have Supreme Courts; beneath them are the District or County intermediate courts and Local or Magistrates trial courts.

Two major free resources for finding legislation across all Australian jurisdictions are Lawlex and AustLII. Government websites (both for the Commonwealth of Australia and for individual states and territories) are also important free resources; for the Commonwealth, the websites for the Federal Register of Legislation (for texts of legislation and government gazettes) and the Australian Parliament (for bills, explanatory memoranda, texts of parliamentary debates, and committee reports) are particularly useful. For caselaw, AustLII and the partly-free/partly-paid platform Jade both include judgments from courts, tribunals, and commissions, as well as citators. Court websites (both for the Commonwealth and for individual states and territories) are also useful sources of the texts of judgments; for Commonwealth courts, see the websites for the High Court of Australia, the Federal Court, and the Family Court.

Legally significant decisions are published in law reports; the most authoritative are those officially selected as authorized law reports, which exist for both the Commonwealth and individual states and territories. For the High Court, the authorized report series is Commonwealth Law Reports (CLR), available in part on AustLII and Jade and in full on Westlaw AU. The authorized report series for the Federal Court is Federal Court Reports (FCR), available on Westlaw AU. Access to authorized reports for states and territories varies; some are available at no charge via AustLII, while others are only available via Westlaw AU or Lexis Advance Australia.

A wide range of secondary sources specific to Australian law (including encyclopedias, dictionaries, looseleaf services, and textbooks) are available, though many are exclusive to Westlaw AU or Lexis Advance Australia. Useful free secondary sources include Trove (a service of the National Library of Australia, which includes archived government websites and gazettes as well as non-law materials); the Monash University guide to legal abbreviations; the Australian Guide to Legal Citation, available as a free PDF from the University of Melbourne; and the Australian Legal Scholarship Library, available on AustLII.

Second Call for IALL 2019 Bloggers

sydneyAre you heading down under for IALL 2019 in Sydney?  We’re still looking for bloggers to recap some of the program for the blog.  We’re had a few volunteers, but are looking for a few more, particularly for the following sessions, but are happy to have coverage of any session you’re planning on attending:

Monday, October 28th
9:45-10:30am:  Keynote: Australia’s Legal History & Colonial Legacy

Tuesday, October 29th
9:30-10:15am:  Australia’s Constitutional Quirks
10:15-11:00am:  International Law in Australia

Wednesday, October 30th
9:30-10:15am:  Contemporary Challenges to Open Justice: Law, Technology, and Culture
1:45-2:30pm:  International Environmental Law in Australia
2:30-3:15pm:  Criminal Law in Australia

If you are willing and able to recap one of these sessions or any other program from IALL 2019, please email Alyson Drake at alyson.drake@ttu.edu or Jessica Pierucci at jpierucci@law.uci.edu.

Call for Bloggers: IALL 2019

volunteerAre you heading down under for IALL 2019 in Sydney?  We’d love to have some recaps of the program for the blog.  We’re particularly interested in the following sessions, but are happy to have coverage of any session you’re planning on attending:
Sunday, October 27th
1:30-4:30pm:  Pre-Conference Workshop:  An Introduction to the Australian Legal System and Legal Research

Monday, October 28th
9:45-10:30am:  Keynote: Australia’s Legal History & Colonial Legacy
11:00–12:30pm:  Australia Indigenous People and the Law

Tuesday, October 29th
9:30-10:15am:  Australia’s Constitutional Quirks
10:15-11:00am:  International Law in Australia
11:30-12:15pm:  Refugee Law in Australia

Wednesday, October 30th
9:30-10:15am:  Contemporary Challenges to Open Justice: Law, Technology, and Culture
1:45-2:30pm:  International Environmental Law in Austrlia
2:30-3:15pm:  Criminal Law in Australia

If you are willing and able to recap one of these sessions or any other program from IALL 2019, please email Alyson Drake at alyson.drake@ttu.edu or Jessica Pierucci at jpierucci@law.uci.edu.

The 2020 Call for Programming Proposals is Open Now!

By Susan Gualtier

The AALL Annual Meeting Program Proposal site is now open!

Remember all of that brainstorming and up-voting you did during the Ideascale phase of program development for the 2020 AALL Annual Conference?  Well, it paid off!  The AMPC has published its list of must-have program topics and there are a number that incorporate the FCIL perspective. For example:

  • Under the Professionalism + Leadership at every level category: Cultural and Identity Awareness and Competencies and Globalization Demands Approaches That Include Foreign, Comparative, and International Perspectives
  • Under the Research + Analysis category: Civil Law Research (including legislative processes, tools, influences on civil law, and Louisiana/New Orleans research)
  • Under the Teaching + Training category: Assisting non-JD Patrons

The AMPC has given us the opportunity to incorporate FCIL programming into almost every category of must-have programming for the New Orleans conference.  We cannot waste this opportunity!

I urge each of you to contact me (sgua@law.upenn.edu) and Dennis Sears (searsd@law.byu.edu) and tell us what you are willing and able to do to help us transform all of the ideas listed above and on Ideascale into actual programs.  We need your help!  We are also available to help you when it comes to navigating the proposal site and developing your programs.  As co-Chairs of the FCIL-SIS Education Committee, it is our job to encourage and support you in developing ideas and program proposals in anticipation of next year’s meeting.

Congratulations on a job well done so far, and we look forward to hearing from you during the proposal process!

mardi-gras-mask

AALL 2019 Recap: FCIL Basics Bootcamp

By Dinah Minkoff

bootcamp.JPGI had the opportunity to attend the Preconference Workshop: FCIL Bootcamp: Basic Training at Georgetown University’s law school.  The morning session promised to provide information on FCIL resources and how to use them with a focus on foreign law, treaties, and EU law.  It delivered on its promise.  Georgetown Law librarians Mabel Shaw, Charles Bjok, and Heather Casey presented.

Mabel Shaw presented “An Introduction to Foreign Legal Research.”  She has been an FCIL librarian at Georgetown, where she is now the Head of International & Foreign Law, for over 18 years.  The presentation began by breaking down the different legal systems intrepid researchers will encounter: Common, Civil, Religious, Customary, and Mixed. As a researcher you need to know what type of legal system you are researching so that you understand not just where to look for information but if that information exists.  Interesting point of fact: outside of the U.S., not all government information is copyright free.  During her presentation, Mabel also allayed a common concern of the foreign legal researcher: you don’t have to speak every language you are researching. In addition to translations of legislation and law, there are myriad translation tools out there like dictionaries and Google Translate.  Use your evaluation skills to determine the reliability of the translation itself.  Look to the date of translation, the site hosting the translation, and whether it was done by a person or AI.

Heather Casey presented “An Introduction to Treaty Research.”  She has been an FCIL librarian for 10 years and teaches Research Skills in International & Comparative Law with Charles Bjork.  Heather’s presentation began by explaining the differences between private and public international law and the various documents that are referred to under the broad category of “treaties” (e.g. conventions, protocols, accords, declarations, charters, and Memorandum of Understanding).  Heather then outlined the best places to begin your research when the U.S. is a party to the treaty (Spoiler Alert: Treaties in Force, the U.S. State Department’s website, and HeinOnline).   After an overview of the treaty ratification process, it was on to researching treaties when the U.S. is not a party.  Good places to search include Multilateral Treaties Deposited with the Secretary-General at the UN, Regional Treaty Collections, and Foreign Ministry websites.  The presentation also reviewed important websites to keep in mind when conducting treaty research such as the EU, Council of Europe, African Union, Organization of American States, and World Trade Organization.  And because we were inside a law school, the session wrapped up with a hypothetical where participants got to put their newly honed FCIL research skills to the test.

Casey.JPG

Heather Casey presenting on how to conduct treaty research.

Finally, Charles Bjok presented on “An Introduction to Researching the Law of the European Union.” He works closely with Georgetown’s sizeable international LLM writing and research program and teaches Research Skills in International & Comparative Law with Heather Casey. This presentation had a two-fold benefit for me: it provided me a great refresher on the topic and confirmed for me that my own presentation on the topic did not have any glaring gaps.  The presentation began with an introduction to the EU, including a brief history, foundational documents, and its current incarnation. The presentation also reviewed the EU’s Seven Institutions and the hierarchy of EU law. What is fantastic about EU research is that despite the numerous institutions within the EU and its various types of law (treaties, legislative acts, and case law), EUR-Lex, the official website of the EU, is a portal to almost everything you will be looking for.  The website is updated daily, and contains some texts dating back to 1951.  The documents on EUR-Lex are freely accessible and available in the 24 official languages of the EU.  One caveat: although case law is available in on EUR-Lex, using CURIA, the CJEU’s website, may prove more beneficial.

PreConferenceWorkshop

The full slate of speakers from the full day FCIL Bootcamp.  From left to right: Heather Casey, Georgetown University Law Library; Prof. Heidi Frostestad Kuehl, Northern Illinois University School of Law; Prof. Jennifer Hillman, Georgetown University Law Center; Mabel Shaw, Georgetown University Law Library; Prof. Lilian Faulhaber, Georgetown University Law Center; and Charles Bjork, Georgetown University Law Library.  

I left the morning session happily on information overload and energized to respond to the future FCIL questions I receive in my role as Global Law Librarian at LA Law Library.  Feel free to reach out with questions about the bootcamp or foreign law generally. I can be reached at dminkoff@lalawlibrary.org.

For insights into the wonderful resources shared by the speakers, please visit https://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/home/foreign-law.

For the afternoon session of the pre-conference workshop, FCIL Bootcamp: Advanced, see this recap.

AALL 2019 Recap: Locating Latin American Legal Sources

By David Isom

Moderated by Sarah Jaramillo, Reference Librarian for International and Foreign Law at NYU Law School, the “Locating Latin American Legal Sources” session on July 15, 2019 consisted of presentations from Jade Madrid, Latin American Studies & Iberian Languages Liaison & Reference Librarian at Georgetown University; Shana Wagger, Program Lead for Digital Projects and Repositories at the World Bank; and Francisco Macías, Head of the Iberia/Rio Office Section at the Law Library of Congress. Each discussed unique aspects of the Latin American materials available at their respective institutions.

Locating Latin American Legal Sources panel.JPG

From left to right: Sarah Jaramillo, Jade Madrid, Shana Wagger, Francisco Macías.

Madrid began by noting various research guides on Latin American legal materials available at Georgetown and elsewhere. She also discussed the challenges that a researcher can encounter when attempting to locate sources of Latin American law: non-hispanophone/non-lusophone researchers may encounter difficulties when seeking primary sources, of course, but there can also be country-specific challenges. For example, while the Library of the National Congress of Chile includes coverage of Chilean law beginning in 1965, it has no coverage for the 17 years (1973–1990) under the dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet. Madrid also mentioned several special collections related to Latin American law available at Georgetown: the papers of Colombian diplomat Tomás Herrán (many relating to the Hay–Herrán Treaty of 1903, which was ratified by the United States Senate but not by the Senate of Colombia); the papers of James Theberge, director of the Latin American and Hispanic Studies Center at Georgetown and United States Ambassador to Nicaragua and Chile; the papers of Panamanian educator, feminist leader, and diplomat Esther Neira de Calvo; and the Alliance for Progress Cartoon Book Program collection, which includes digital copies of comic books produced by the American anti-communist development program in Latin America established by President John F. Kennedy.

Escuela de Traidores.jpg

Escuela de Traidores (School for Traitors), date unknown, from Georgetown’s Alliance for Progress Cartoon Book Program collection.

Wagger said that the World Bank’s open access program that publishes 90–110 books a year, primarily digitally. The program is intended to make information available to the decision-makers involved in development programs in order to support the World Bank’s broad mission of ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity. Wagger explained that the World Bank produces four major types of resources: focused publications (such as the Doing Business series of national and regional economic profiles, the Latin American Development Forum series covering economic and social issues, and the World Bank Legal Review); electronic repositories (the Documents & Reports platform which includes more than 330,000 World Bank documents from 1946 to the present, the Open Knowledge Repository of almost 29,000 publications from roughly 2000 to the present, and the subscription World Bank eLibrary); the World Bank Open Data platform, which provides free access to various types of development-related information, including demographic, environmental, financial, and industry data; and other specialized resources such as the Projects & Operations website, the World Bank Group Archives, and the Access to Information portal.

Macías started his presentation by discussing the history of the Law Library of Congress’ collection of foreign law materials, which began in 1848 (in the aftermath of the Mexican-American War) when President James K. Polk ordered the Library to begin collecting materials concerning the law of Mexico. Since then, the Law Library of Congress has grown substantially, collecting the laws of more than 270 jurisdictions in more than 200 languages. Five foreign law specialists work in the unit which covers the laws of Spain, Portugal, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Philippines. Electronic materials include country-specific research guides available in the Library’s Guide to Law Online and the In Custodia Legis blog—see, for example, this post on “Cinco de Mayo and the History of Mexican Codification.” One highlight of the Library’s Latin American materials is the Mexican Revolution and the United States exhibition, which includes historical newspaper articles, maps, photographs, and film footage.

Posada Asalto de Zapatistas.jpg

José Guadalupe Posada, Asalto de Zapatistas (Assault of the Zapatistas), 1910, from the Library of Congress’ Mexican Revolution and the United States exhibition.

AALL 2019 Recap: FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant Presentation – African Law for Everyone: AfricanLII and Laws.Africa

By: Loren Turner

Mariya

On Monday, July 15, 2019, the 2019 FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant recipient, Mariya Badeva-Bright, who leads the AfricanLII project at the University of Cape Town, South Africa (and recently co-founded Laws.Africa, a legislative commons), delivered a fantastic presentation titled “African Law for Everyone: AfricanLII and Laws.Africa.” Mariya’s presentation was a summary of her motivations and processes for gathering and digitizing African law as well as a “call to action” to law librarians worldwide for help in making African law accessible to all.

African Law for Everyone: AfricanLII and Laws.Africa

Mariya began her presentation by stating that there is no reliable, consistent, and up-to-date access to the law in many African countries – free or not.  Mariya provided several reasons for the lack of access to legal information: indifference of commercial publishers; lack of funds and skills on the local levels; poor record keeping; and low level corruption. She argued that there can be no justice without access to legal information.  When the law is not available freely and easily, judges cannot determine precedent; rich litigants have an unfair advantage.  As support, Mariya shared visual images of legislative texts in which pages were literally cut out, edited by hand, and then reinserted.  The reality, Mariya said, is that lots of African law is in such condition and this format frustrates access to justice.

Mariya explained that the AfricanLII and the Laws.Africa projects are about building an open infrastructure of African legal information with opportunity for sophisticated searches. They have to be open to anyone and offer speed, efficiency, services, growth and development.

AfricanLII was founded in 2010 to promote the role of LIIs in Africa. It now offers a federated search of over 250k documents of African legal information. Additionally, in response to user demand, it has begun to create case indices, including the Human Rights Law Index and the Commercial Law Index. It also provides a current awareness newsletter that started out as a service for judges but has expanded to anyone interested in following legal developments in African law (subscribe at the bottom of this page). Most recently, AfricanLII launched a citator service, available in beta format. It is the first visual citator in the access to law movement, but what is more remarkable is that it creates a citator service for cases that were never published in law reports and, therefore, don’t have citations!  The AfricanLII database sees about 400,000 unique users per month, 90% of which are within Africa.  Users are primarily from the justice sector (lawyers, judges, paralegals, magistrates, law students, government workers, etc.) but there is an increase in “average joes” accessing the database.

When the AfricanLII project began, there was a conscious choice to focus on gathering and digitizing cases rather than legislation.  Cases have their own value, but outdated legislation has little value.  The creators of AfricanLII had concerns about the future credibility of their project if they uploaded outdated legislation.  Plus, the reality is that in most African countries, there is no free source of consolidated, up-to-date legislation.

The Laws.Africa project developed to address the lack of freely available access to African legislation. The creators of the Laws.Africa project surveyed other country’s attempts at making legislation current and freely accessible.  They decided that the UK’s legislation.gov.uk was the model “golden” standard outside of Africa because of its rich interface and up-to-date, authoritative corpus.  Within Africa, the “golden” standards were Kenya law, an authoritative source of Kenyan legislation, and OpenBylaws.org.za, which focuses on improving access to South African by-laws.

Laws.Africa is an open source, cloud platform for efficient cost-effective consolidation and publication of African legislation.  It aims to crowdsource an open digital archive of African gazettes and use technology (in particular, Akoma Ntoso, a non-proprietary, XML markup standard for legislative documents) to consolidate legislation. In terms of processes: once a gazette is uploaded onto the Laws.Africa platform, a group of contributors (law students and law library students) extract individual Acts and identify changes to the Act over time.  A small group of reviewers check the work of the contributors (there is a two-step review process). After review, the consolidated legislation becomes available in a variety of formats.

The Laws.Africa project has already acquired and uploaded over 13,000 national gazettes.  These gazettes are available in .pdf versions through a linked sister site called Gazettes.Africa.  But, it takes a village to make a complete collection!  Unfortunately, Mariya explained, the law of Africa is not in Africa.  Instead, many African gazettes, especially historical ones, are located in libraries outside of Africa.  To continue building the collection of African gazettes and legislation on the Laws.Africa portal, Mariya and her colleagues need law librarians and digitizers in the U.S. and U.K. to donate their African gazettes to the project.  Mariya believes that crowdsourcing these gazettes is the best way to reach the goal of a complete collection.

Mariya concluded her presentation with an appeal: Join our community! Donate your gazettes!  Spread the word about the AfricanLII and Laws.Africa projects!  She received a great round of applause.

For a video of Mariya’s FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant presentation, as given at Yale Law Library subsequent to the 2019 AALL Annual Meeting, follow this link.