AALL 2018 Recap: Education Committee Meeting – Program Planning for DC

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By: Loren Turner

The FCIL-SIS Education Committee met at the crack of dawn (7:00 am) on Tuesday, July 17th to begin brainstorming and strategizing for the AALL 2019 conference in Washington, D.C.  We were joined by two members of the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC), Sabrina Sondhi (our official FCIL liaison to the AMPC) and Alyson Drake.  Sabrina and Alyson shared the AMPC’s timeline for gathering program ideas and proposals.  Alyson will be writing a separate DipLawMatic blog post that covers the AMPC’s timeline and goals in more detail, but in a nutshell, there is a two-step process for us to get some FCIL-related programming into the DC conference: (1) submit and up-vote your undeveloped, wild and crazy ideas to the Ideascale platform (from now until August 17th) and (2) submit your developed, professional program proposals to the AMPC (Labor Day-ish until October 1).

We have an excellent location for the next conference and the Georgetown folks who joined our meeting are already on-the-ball with fab ideas on international taxation, international trade, and international human rights.  What about you?!  What programming do you want to see in D.C. for your professional development?

Dennis Sears (searsd@law.byu.edu) and I (lturner@umn.edu) would L.O.V.E. to hear from you!  Tell us what you want to learn.  Tell us what you want to teach. Tell us who you know and what they might offer.  We will do your cold-calls.  We will help craft your wild and crazy ideas into fully-developed programs (or pre-conference workshops). We need you to help us create substantive FCIL programming for the AALL 2019 conference.  Let’s do this.

AALL 2018 Recap: Impostor Syndrome: The Plague (or Good Fortune) of the Smart Professional

By Jennifer Allison, FCIL Librarian, Harvard Law School Library

This program was presented by Cynthia Bassett (University of Missouri), Kristyn Seo Taff (University of Minnesota), and Kenneth Hirsh (University of Cincinnati).

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Image via Medium.com

People who suffer from “Impostor Syndrome” are generally “high achievers who are afraid to be unmasked.”  Can you relate?  You probably can if you can claim any of the following:

  1. You believe that successes you experience in your life are due to luck, timing, or computer error.
  2. You feel compelled to minimize your accomplishments by saying things like, “If I can do it, then anyone can.”
  3. You feel crushed when you receive constructive criticism.
  4. You tend to agonize over every single one of your “flaws.”
  5. You honestly think that it’s only a matter time that everyone will find out that you are a complete fraud.

This program sought to “throw some light” on the negative feelings that characterize Impostor Syndrome, because they “live and thrive in darkness.”

According to the literature, as many as 70% of people suffer from Impostor Syndrome, from creative types to successful business people.  Despite the common belief that it predominantly affects women, men also suffer from its effects.

To better illustrate how Impostor Syndrome manifests itself, the speakers presented the following five archetypal categories:

  • Perfectionist:
    Constantly worried about measuring up, a perfectionist is a micro-manager who has trouble delegating tasks, sets insanely high marks to live up, and ruminates over situations that are not 100% perfect.
  • Superman/Superwoman:
    This category includes people who, because they are terrified that they have not earned their position or title, always stay late at the office, feel stressed when they are not working, and tend to sacrifice their hobbies and passions.
  • Natural Genius:
    A natural genius is a straight-A, gold star student who was always praised for being “the smart one.”  These people want to do everything perfectly the first time, avoid challenges, and dislike having a mentor.
  • Rugged Individualist:
    People in this category don’t like to ask for help and want to accomplish everything on their own.
  • Expert:
    These are people who feel that they tricked their employers into hiring them – they never feel like they know enough, and they are constantly seeking additional training opportunities. They will never apply for a job unless they believe that they are 100% qualified for it – which they never really do.

Understanding how Impostor Syndrome impacts your life and behavior can be helpful to overcome its damaging effects, although it is important to not trend too far in the other direction.  The polar opposite of Impostor Syndrome is known as the Dunning-Kruger effect, in which incompetent people are extraordinarily confident, self-assured, and secure in their abilities, mainly because they fail to recognize their own incompetence.  A healthy, moderate dose of self-awareness can help in striking an appropriate balance between these two extremes.

Impostor Syndrome can affect anyone at any stage of his or her career and life, as the personal testimonials from each of the presenters illustrated.  Hirsh’s battle with Impostor Syndrome started when he became a law library director, and manifested itself as feeling that he had “lucked into his position.”  Both Seo Taff and Bassett spoke of their personal experience as law librarians who do not have law degrees.  Seo Taff, who has always been “a planner” and currently works as an access services librarian in an academic law library, has found herself on a career path that did not match her post-MLIS five-year plan, and is currently serving in her fourth professional position in three years, which appears to actually have worked out quite well for her.  Bassett, after eleven years in the profession, decided to go to law school because, even though she is a competent teacher of legal research, she “felt like a fraud” when the students asked her questions that she couldn’t answer.

So how can Impostor Syndrome be characterized as a provider of “good fortune?”  According to the presentation, it serves as an indicator that people are growing and moving into a space where they are becoming better versions of themselves.  This point had a profound impact on me personally.  I try to be an optimist, and I had to believe that Impostor Syndrome (which I have suffered from for years myself) is, in some way, also a force for good in my life.

So what are some strategies that we can use to overcome the negative effects of Impostor Syndrome?  The presenters offered the following suggestions:

  • Compare and despair – stop comparing yourself to others! That never accomplishes anything positive and just makes you unhappy.
  • Mindfulness – go outside and take a walk! Be aware of the feelings Impostor Syndrome awakens in you, and use them as a strategy to do something positive for yourself.
  • Invite it in – respond to feelings by accepting and not squelching them, and reframe the feelings so that they can have a positive impact.
  • Practice self-compassion, and treat yourself like you would treat a good friend.
  • Choose an affirmation – one of the panelists reported regularly repeating the phrase, “All is good in my world.”
  • Decide on your mission, and use your energy to further it, rather than undermine it.
  • Recast yourself – remove yourself from the situation and put your best friend in it instead. What would you say and do to provide comfort and encouragement?
  • Add sunlight – acknowledge the validity of your feelings.
  • Find a mentor – have someone you trust who you can talk to, and consider finding someone who is outside your organization and can be a bit more neutral.
  • Find your community, whether in affinity groups or in social media.

The program concluded with an exercise.  Everyone at each table wrote a statement about his or her experience with Impostor Syndrome on an index card, and then each person at the table read someone else’s card.  This was a really powerful experience, because it showed that none of us are alone in these feelings, no matter how much it seems like it.

After reflecting on the presentations and the exercise, I came up with a few more if my own strategies for battling the negative effects of Impostor Syndrome:

  • Focus on strengths rather than perceived weaknesses.
  • Minimize wasting time with pity parties.
  • Surround yourself with positive people.
  • Be brave – have the courage to eliminate self-doubt, negative self-talk, and feelings that you aren’t good enough. Even if you think they’re working for you, they’re not.
  • Fight perfectionism! Instead, get things done as well as you can, and then move on and enjoy your life.
  • Appreciate your intellect.

I have a feeling that Impostor Syndrome will always play a role in my own life.  However, after attending this program and journaling my thoughts about it, I feel a renewed sense of purpose and energy, and am looking forward to being better able to bolster myself when Impostor Syndrome reasserts itself in the future.

Report on the 2018 DILA-KOREA and KIOST Workshop

By Jootaek Lee, Reference Librarian (Faculty) at Rutgers Law School

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I recently visited Korea and was honored to be invited to attend a summer meeting hosted by the Development of International Law in Asia-Korea (“DILA-Korea”) and the Korean Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (“KIOST”) on June 1, 2018.  About 20 Korean international law scholars, an ambassador and a congresswoman were invited and quite intensively discussed contemporary legal issues surrounding the Korean peninsular especially on territories and sea.  The meeting started at 9:30am and continued until 6:00 pm and was quite overwhelming to me, but quite exciting to see and discuss the most current international legal issues among South Korea, North Korea, Japan and China.

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The President of DILA-Korea, Professor Seokwoo Lee from the Inha University Law School started the meeting and briefly introduced the DILA-Korea.  The Foundation for the Development of International Law in ASIA (“DILA”) is a non-government international organization and was established in 1989, seeking, identifying, and analyzing developments in international law in Asia and revealing common interests and concerns among Asian states ultimately to be shared with the international community. DILA-Korea hosts many scholarly meetings and colloquia every year.  DILA publishes the famous Asian Yearbook of International Law, which summarizes Asian state practices and identifies international law issues and developments in Asia with the Asian perspectives; current editors-in-chief are Professor Seokwoo Lee and Professor Hee Eun Lee from Handong International Law School in Korea.

Heecheol Yang, Director, Ocean Policy Institute, KIOST, continued to introduce his organization and its research goals of looking towards the future ocean, reviving the ocean, searching for marine resources, protecting Korean ocean, and making safer ocean.  He also introduced current research projects and ships and facilities used for research.  I could see how Korean governments are making efforts to make sustainable developments of oceans surrounding Korea and to collaborate with Japan and China.

A guest speaker, congresswoman Sangjung Sim, introduced many political issues between South Korea and North Korea and how Korean congress is dealing with environmental problems in many different areas. Another guest speaker, Professor Joonsoo Jon from Sogang University, suggested strategies to facilitate commerce between South and North Korea; he emphasized the use of marine routes instead of roads and rails because marine routes are more cost-effective.

Three big topics were discussed among the scholars after the guest speakers. The first topic was about the current political changes surrounding the Korean peninsula, especially between South Korea and North Korea, and how it affects the existing legal issues relating to territories and sea.  Also discussed are Northern Limit Line between South and North Korea, Pyunghwa Suyuk (artificial peaceful fishing zones between South Korea and North Korea), maritime boundaries between Korea and China, and the Agreement between Japan and the Republic of Korea concerning Joint Development of the Southern Part of the Continental Shelf Adjacent to the Two Counties.

The second topic was about the development of international law in Asia. Eastphalia by Professor Sungwon Kim, Third World Approach to International Law (“TWAIL”) by Professor Buhmsuk Baek, and the Definition of a Region in International Law by Professor Sijin Oh were presented and discussed together with the attendants. Especially, the concept of Eastphalia compared with Westphalia was very interesting and received great attention from participants. Eastphalia was seeking to reflect Asian history, philosophies, theories, and humanism into the existing international law and suggesting openness and plural perspectives in global governance and Western-based power frame.

The third topic was about the publication of Brill’s Encyclopedia of Public International Law in Asia (BEPILA) – Korea. Most participants of the meeting chose their own topic and made presentations on their own terms to write on. For this project, Japanese and Chinese scholars are also participating. I was also honored to participate in this project and write on the terms relating to the international criminal law topic. The database for this project will be available soon for researchers.

Finally, after the meeting, participants enjoyed a great reception at the 23rd floor terrace of the hotel, commanding a nice view of Seoul. It was quite an exciting experience to me, and I hope to join this meeting every year. Anyone who is interested in Asian international law issues will find it worthwhile to pay attention to this organization and its publication, Asian Yearbook of International Law. Most participants of the meeting are also members of the Korean Society of International Law.

Korea Workshop3

What Helped Me Transition to the Law Firm Library

By Catherine Deane

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In my previous blog post on DipLawMatic Dialogues, entitled Transition to Law Firm From Academia, I talked about my experiences as a new law firm librarian. In the wake of that post, I made a lot of new librarian friends, many of whom asked me some follow up questions, to the tune of “how do I do that too?” I don’t have a one size fits all answer for how to transition to a law firm job, but these are the things that helped me to make the transition. Warning! There are no fish in this post, only lessons about how to fish.

Patience

During my time in the deep South, I raised holy Hell in law librarian circles, because I could see what you can all see now, that racism, sexism, and homophobia are all rampant in the South, and those of us who live(d) there carry the consequences in our bodies. In other words, it makes us physically ill. For my part, I gained 50 lbs, walked with a cane because of the intense pain in both feet–a side effect of the medication that I had to take to survive there. My intelligence and ability to feel my feelings were dulled by anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medication, but this was part of a short term strategy to survive. To share with you authentically, I have to admit that I was a mess, and every day was a gauntlet to be run. I ran out of spoons by roughly 10:00am and struggled through the rest of the day. I developed some serious coping mechanisms.

  1. Having a best friend at the office (Mary Miles Prince, yes, you. Stop blushing.)
  2. Listening to Buddhist dharma talks by Pema Chödrön in the car, and using Byron Katie’s The Work, to help me Jedi mind trick myself into being able to survive the constant barrage of racist micro-aggressions.
  3. Snuggling with my dogs (in spite of a serious allergy to dogs.)
  4. Happy Hour (not the best coping mechanism, but it was what was available and what I was capable of at the time).
  5. Solidarity (I made friends with body positive femme queers, Black lesbians and slightly racist–in a clueless kind of way–artistic hippies.)

I looked for jobs several times a day, every day. I applied for many jobs, but often lost steam part way through because I could see that even though living in NOT THE SOUTH was technically better for me than living in the South, fleeing to a job that was not a great fit for me would create more problems that it would solve.

So I waited.

I was offered the perfect job (on paper), but the pay would have me eating ramen and spending all of my free time clipping coupons and commuting to and from work. I wouldn’t be healthier or happier because I wouldn’t be able to afford the circus classes that I wanted to take and I wouldn’t have money to go to any shows or to travel back to see my family for the holidays.

I almost got the perfect job, but I would have to deal with a harsh winter when my body was still in so much pain that the cold would make it impossible to walk and the job location made it impossible to drive in. So I withdrew my candidacy.

Each time, I asked myself, how can you give up this opportunity to escape, but I knew that I should walk towards what I wanted rather than walking away from what I feared and despised. I had anxiety dreams every night and every morning I woke up in a body that was in unbearable levels of pain, and still I endured.

Courage

Courage is being afraid and doing the scary thing anyway. I was able to be patient because I was courageous. Of course I was afraid that I was aging out of the most prolific job openings and that my outspokenness with regard to the rampant racism that I could see around me would close so many doors that I would be stuck in Nashville forever. In the end, none of this mattered. Two amazing opportunities came up for me at the same time and I had a chance to evaluate them both side by side. One was for a Bay Area job, working closely with people who I know, respect, and believe that I would have gotten along well with in the workplace. The other was at Shearman & Sterling LLP.

Against the advice of my father, who adores me and is a brilliant business man, I chose the law firm position, in large part because of the location and the hours (I work 5.5 hours a day), although I’m sure that’s not what I said in the interview. I would have said something about wanting to do more practical work, which was true but was maybe reason number seven coming well after living in a place full of extreme liberal social justice warriors, circus freaks, queers, yogis, Buddhists, and polyamorous people. Now that I have been here for almost a year, I can see that taking this law firm job was a good decision for me. If you want to know how anxious I was, see my previous post.

It also took courage to send in a resume for a job that I didn’t feel fully qualified for.

A little help from my friends

One challenging thing that people have asked about is, “How did I modify my academic law librarian resume to apply for law firm librarian positions?” That’s an excellent question because these are two totally different jobs, with some overlapping skill sets.

How I did this starts with what I do at conferences. AALL, SLA, ASIL, IALL, it doesn’t matter, it’s all the same to me, I talk to people. I’m interested in getting to know them, so I talk to them. When I was a wee lass, I had no social skills. I blamed it on having spent more time with books than with people. But just like I learned everything else, I aggressively pursued learning how to talk to people, all kinds of people: People who I agree with and people who I vehemently disagree with, people who I’d like to take to dinner, and people who I’d like to push off a cliff. I learned this by practicing and by being aware of how my tactics impacted my communication goals. It was hard on my ego, but it was worth it.

After several years of going to conferences, I had a lot of conference friends, people who I had deep conversations with over beverages, about how cute the waiter was, or about why all of the Black law librarians sit together at the SEAALL meetings. In politics, this is apparently called surfacing, but to me, it’s just being an empathetic and authentic human in all of my interactions.

Many friends gave me the low down on why their jobs, although picture perfect on paper, were in actuality, a nightmare and this allowed me to steer clear of those jobs, no matter how enticing they seemed at the time. It also gave me a laundry list of questions to ask to ensure that other jobs that seemed great didn’t have those same pitfalls. In hushed voices, looking over their shoulders, librarians shared with me what made their jobs awful, because friends don’t let friends…take terrible jobs, at least not without a warning.

I now know a lot of law librarians and vendors of all kinds and when I needed to transition to the law firm, you can bet that I asked the law firm librarians who were my friends for advice on my resume. Some even gave me copies of their winning resumes.

I know I said no fish, but here are a few fish. Here’s how I adapted my resume and cover letter.

  • Law firms are mostly interested in whether or not you can do research in databases, so I emphasized my experience with Westlaw, Lexis, and other legal databases.
  • I spent about a year doing legal document review at a law firm, so I used that to show that I had some familiarity with the law firm environment.
  • The cover letter is where you can draw similarities between your experience and the experiences of law firm librarians so that you can show that your experience is equivalent.
  • I provided research services to faculty who were doing real world work, so I highlighted that in my cover letter.

Recruiter

I’ll never really know if I could have gotten this job without a recruiter, but I will say that I applied for many a law firm job, and it wasn’t until a recruiter noticed me, and I listened and did exactly what the recruiter told me to do that I successfully got an offer from a law firm. I just have a strong suspicion that having the recruiter introduce me to the firm and help me to understand the lay of the land was the final piece of the puzzle for me in being able to prove that my skills were transferable.

Conclusion

I’m eleven months in and still feeling very lucky and grateful to have landed this job. If you see me at the 2018 AALL annual meeting, please feel free to stop me. I’d love to connect with you and I’m happy to authentically share my experiences with you. Just ask.

Final Call for Bloggers for AALL 2018 in Baltimore

Baltimore
DipLawMatic Dialogues is finalizing its coverage of the AALL Annual Meeting.  Please consider helping out your fellow law librarians who aren’t able to attend this year (or will be in Baltimore, but can’t attend everything they’d like to) by volunteering to recap a session of the program you’re already planning on attending!

So far, we’ve only had a few volunteers, so we’re looking for quite a few more, including covering some of the following FCIL-related programs:

  • Sunday, July 15th, 12:45-2:15pm:  Jewish Law “Lunch and Learn”
  • Monday, July 16th, 3:30-4:30pm: FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign and International Legal Research Interest Group

We are also looking for bloggers who are attending other programs/discussions dens not directly related to FCIL librarianship, but that may be of interest to our readers.  A few examples that stood out to us (but contact us with any other programs you’re interested in blogging):

  • Sunday, July 15th, 11:30-12:30pm: Should One Judge Have All This Power
  • Monday, July 16th, 10:00-12:30pm: Best Practices in Employee Management: Strategies for Building a Productive and Engaged Library Team
  • Monday, July 16th, 11:30-12:30pm: Don’t Just Hire the Best–Keep Them
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Changing Paths and Opening Doors: Transferring Skills Across Law Library Types and Sectors
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Teaching Tech
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 8:30-9:30am:  It’s All About Relationships: Marketing to Your Library’s Stakeholders
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 10:00-11:00am: Lightning Lessons: Research Instruction in a Flash
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 11:30-12:30pm: Setting Priorities, Meeting Deadlines, and Managing Projects for Law Librarians

We hope you’ll help us out!  Contact Alyson Drake (alyson.drake@ttu.edu) with any programs you’d be interested in recapping.

Introducing…Mariana Newman as the July 2018 FCIL Librarian of the Month

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1.Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Los Angeles, CA. I bleed Dodger blue!

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

When I was at UCLA Law, I was a research assistant for two+ years in their library research assistant program. I was fortunate to have the guidance of library director Kevin Gerson and librarian Jenny Lentz after law school during a time when I was questioning my path. They suggested law librarianship, and I felt like it might be the perfect fit. I’m also grateful for the mentorship of Richard Jost at the UW law librarianship program who helped mold me into a law librarian.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

Here at Columbia I’ve learned more about foreign, comparative, and international law librarianship through our administrative rotation system. I’ve been working with our International, Comparative, and Foreign Law Librarian, Silke Sahl, since January. I felt so lucky to be able to attend the ASIL Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in April, and listen to some fascinating speakers and meet many FCIL librarians.

4.Who is your current employer? How long have  you worked there?

I’m currently employed at the Arthur W. Diamond Law Library at Columbia Law School, and I’ve worked here for just under a year.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

I took French in high school and was an Italian minor in college, but both languages are pretty rusty now. I’d love to find more opportunities to practice speaking both!

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

I’ve only been a law librarian for a year and am in my first post-MLIS job, so right now I’d say my biggest professional achievement is making it to the other side of the first year happy that I am in this career!

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

Guacamole. I could eat my cousin Mimi’s guacamole and chips until I exploded. My coworker (and FCIL-SIS Secretary-Treasurer) Sabrina Sondhi recently shared with me some avocados her parents picked from the tree in their yard in Southern California and mailed all the way to New York. I was in heaven!

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

I am really not a dancer, but I do love to sing at the top of my lungs while driving (something I miss since moving to New York City, since singing on the subway is generally not appreciated. ;)) Paul Simon’s Graceland album is an old favorite for car singing.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

I would love to be able to sing beautifully or play the piano past my “quit lessons at age 11” level. I so admire people with natural singing talent!

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

This is perhaps a little odd, but I couldn’t live without hand lotion. Even if my hands don’t “feel” dry, they feel dry to me. I was just on a glorious short vacation on Prince Edward Island with two of my library school friends, and I picked up a bottle of “Island Potato Face & Hand Cream.” We learned that Islanders are very proud of their potato industry, and this lotion is made with 70% potato juice. I must say, my hands smell like I’ve been slicing raw potatoes after I use it, but they are feeling very soft!

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

Just that I’m grateful to be a member of such a friendly and generous professional community, and I look forward to meeting more of you at the AALL Annual Meeting this month.

 

Second Call for Bloggers for AALL 2018 in Baltimore

DipLawMatic Dialogues is looking to continue our tradition of providing excellent coverage of the AALL Annual Meeting.  Help out your fellow law librarians who aren’t able to attend this year (or will be in Baltimore, but can’t attend everything they’d like to) by volunteering to recap a session of the program you’re already planning on attending!

So far, we’ve only had two volunteers, so we’re looking for quite a few more, including covering some of the following FCIL-related programs:

  • Sunday, July 15th, 12:45-2:15pm:  Jewish Law “Lunch and Learn”
  • Monday, July 16th, 12:30pm:  FCIL-SIS Book Discussion Group Meeting
  • Monday, July 16th, 3:30-4:30pm: FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign and International Legal Research Interest Group
  • Monday, July 16th, 4:45-5:45pm: FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians Recipient Presentation

We are also looking for bloggers who are attending other programs/discussions dens not directly related to FCIL librarianship, but that may be of interest to our readers.  A few examples that stood out to us (but contact us with any other programs you’re interested in blogging):

  • Sunday, July 15th, 11:30-12:30pm: Should One Judge Have All This Power
  • Sunday, July 15th, 2:30-3:30pm: Diverse Interactions: Addressing Race and Implicit Bias in Legal Research Instruction
  • Monday, July 16th, 10:00-12:30pm: Best Practices in Employee Management: Strategies for Building a Productive and Engaged Library Team
  • Monday, July 16th, 11:30-12:30pm: Don’t Just Hire the Best–Keep Them
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Changing Paths and Opening Doors: Transferring Skills Across Law Library Types and Sectors
  • Monday, July 16th, 2:00-3:00pm: Teaching Tech
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 8:30-9:30am:  It’s All About Relationships: Marketing to Your Library’s Stakeholders
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 8:30-9:30am: 25 Free Technologies for Law Libraries
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 10:00-11:00am: Lightning Lessons: Research Instruction in a Flash
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 11:30-12:30pm: Training the Lawyers of Tomorrow Through the Clinics of Today: Three Models for Practical Library Services in Clinical Law School Settings and Beyond
  • Tuesday, July 17th, 11:30-12:30pm: Setting Priorities, Meeting Deadlines, and Managing Projects for Law Librarians

We hope you’ll help us out!  Contact Alyson Drake (alyson.drake@ttu.edu) with any programs you’d be interested in recapping.

Baltimore