Introducing…Bianca Anderson as the January 2020 FCIL-SIS Member of the Month

1. Where did you grow up?

I grew up three miles from where I work now, in Miami.  I count myself very lucky to be able to be able to not only work at my alma mater but to live in a community in which I have deep roots.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

I practiced immigration law mostly in a non-profit setting for almost ten years focusing mainly on deportation defense.  While I felt it was deeply important work that made a real impact on a personal level for my clients,  I became increasingly frustrated by inefficiency and inequity in the immigration system.  I decided it was a good time to make a career change.  My brother and sister-in-law were already librarians, and I always admired their dedication to the needs of their patrons and the contribution they as librarians could make on their patron’s lives.  I viewed law librarianship as an opportunity to use my legal education and knowledge while still in service of others, the aspect I found most appealing of my immigration practice.  The last two years, I have had the opportunity to teach an Introduction to Legal Research course tailored to non-native English speakers in our LLM programs, in addition to Foreign & International Legal Research.  Teaching is an entirely different aspect of law  librarianship, with a  whole new world of challenges and opportunities that continue to present themselves.  I am truly enjoying this new role and am more certain than ever that I made the right choice all those years ago.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

As a natural consequence of my immigration practice, I often had to research foreign and international laws, particularly in regards to international human rights norms, country condition information, and foreign laws related to marriage and family.  In the years that I have been the Foreign & International Law Librarian here at UM, I have developed a deep fondness for the field.  The field is so diverse and rich, my work is never boring, and I love learning something new with every project I assist on.  I can’t deny that I also love the thrill of the chase, and I very much enjoy finding obscure materials that a student or faculty member regarded “unfindable.”  It’s a superpower!

4. Who is your current employer? How long have  you worked there?

I am Librarian Assistant Professor & Lecturer in Law at the University of Miami.  I have worked here a little over seven years.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

As the child of Cuban immigrants, I speak Spanish fluently.  My knowledge of Spanish deepened in my immigration practice as it was invaluable to communicate with my clients in their native language.  I have a reading fluency of French, having studied it for five years in high school and university.  Unfortunately, I have not had as much opportunity as I would’ve liked to improve my spoken French, but it does remain a goal of mine.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

I am probably proudest of my role in designing the Fall research workshop series for our library.  We found ourselves without an Instructional Services Librarian one Fall, and I was asked to design and run the workshop series.  In the past, the workshop series covered mostly substantive topic research sessions based on course offerings specifically for that semester.  I designed a Fall workshop series structured around basic skills needed to conduct legal research, based on AALL’s Principles and Standards for Legal Research Competency.  I called it the Legal Research Toolbox, and offered the following workshops: Creating a Research Plan, Keyword Selection, Terms and Connectors, Citators, Using Annotations Effectively, and Weight of Authority.  I was astounded and delighted by the overwhelmingly positive response.  In  the first semester we presented the Legal Research Toolbox Series, we had 63% increase in attendance to the year before and a 127% increase to the year before that. Those numbers are even more impressive when you consider that in we only offered six workshops, whereas in previous semesters we offered an average of nine.  I once again planned and coordinated the workshop series the following Fall, and our attendance levels continued to increase.  The coordination of the workshop series returned to the Instructional Services Librarian once the position was filled, and the new librarian in the role has continued to employ the structure and topics that I implemented for the Fall workshops, with the additions of workshops on Evaluating Sources, and Artificial Intelligence in Legal Research, which I have co-taught with him.  The attendance levels still continue to increase each Fall.  I am so glad to have been able to contribute to a service that students seek out and find helpful as they develop and improve their research skills.

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

Dessert!  I definitely have a sweet tooth and to me, a meal feels incomplete without a touch of something sweet at the end.  I have a particular weakness for lemon desserts- lemon cake, lemon cookies, lemon soufflé.  I can’t say no!

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

I struggled way too long contemplating this, so I’ll break the rules and name a few.

My obsession over the last few years has been cast recording of the musical Hamilton.  I think Lin-Manuel Miranda is a true genius. Among my prized possessions are copies of the Hamilton and In the Heights librettos, signed by Mr. Miranda.   I’ve been lucky enough to see the show in Chicago  and on tour in Fort Lauderdale, and I have tickets to see the tour again in Miami in March! Much to my children’s shame and embarrassment, particularly my teenager, I like to break out into song, and lately, it is usually a song from Hamilton.  One of my standards at karaoke is “My Shot.”  I’ve been told it is truly an experience to witness!

Besides that I love all sorts of music- some favorites in no particular order- the Beatles, Beach Boys, Phoenix, Adele, Taylor Swift, Ed Sheeran, Iron & Wine.  There are a few songs I just can’t resist dancing to, a couple recent ones are “Uptown Funk”by Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson and “Shake it Off” by Taylor Swift.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

Can it be a make believe skill?  I wish I could teleport.  Just snap my fingers and be where I need to be in an instant.  I have a 4 year old and a 13 year old, and, well- most parents know the drill- there are dance classes, art classes, soccer practices, baseball practices, school events, parent teacher conferences, PTA meetings, homework, and projects, that all need to be attended to- and that’s just your typical Wednesday!

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

I am a bit ashamed to admit this, but I feel like I am missing a limb without my phone.  My entire existence (and my family’s!) is kept organize on that little device- calendars, reminders, to do lists, maps, notes, photos, emails, chats, all of it!  I do try to be aware of how much I use the phone and set rules for myself that I hope my kids will emulate- 1) no phone at the dinner table- the person sitting in front of you is more important than the screen, 2) not every minute of every day needs to be captured by a photo- I’d rather experience the moment than capture a picture of it, and 3) do only one thing at a time- no driving and cell phone, no watching television and cell phone, no walking and cell phone.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

I very much appreciate this group and my colleagues in the FCIL-SIS.  I never fail to be awed and inspired by the work all of you do, and I count myself fortunate to part of such a collaborative and supportive community.

Introducing…Dennis Sears as the November 2019 FCIL-SIS Member of the Month

Sears, Dennis FCIL1. Where did you grow up?

Salt Lake City, UT

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

I worked as a reference assistant during law school and my career headed that way soon after that.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

I have always had an interest in history and the humanities, especially European.  My interest in foreign, comparative, and international law grew out of that.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have  you worked there?

My current employer is Brigham Young University,  I have worked there for thirty years.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

I speak German.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

Teaching legal research at the Law School.  I have loved teaching first year legal research as well as advanced legal research, federal tax research, and international research.

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

Chocolate

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

“The Impossible Dream” from Man of La Mancha

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

I wish I were more creative.

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

Time to ponder.  If I don’t/can’t take that time, my day just seems to fall apart.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

I find working with people in the FCIL-SIS one of the most fulfilling parts of my profession.

Introducing…Stephanie Wilson as the October 2019 FCIL Member of the Month

Stephanie Wilson1. Where did you grow up? I grew up in California; first in Brookdale, in the Santa Cruz Mountains; then eventually in Carmel.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career? When I went to CUNY Law School to get my JD I worked as a research assistant for several professors who were doing ground breaking work in women’s reproductive health and domestic violence issues.  I discovered that I loved researching. I graduated and worked as a lawyer for five years; my last stint was as a lawyer with the Juvenile Rights Division of New York City’s Legal Aid Society, and I realized the power of research in crafting arguments and outcomes. I hated litigation, but still found the law interesting and full of mysteries. Librarianship seemed like the perfect fit for me. And it still is!

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law? I developed this interest way back in law school, when I took a course in the international law of human rights.  I felt like a secret passage had been opened and here was an entire world of different legal structures, diverse cultures, norms, and concepts.  I was hooked from then on.  More recently I’ve had the opportunity to research questions in international human rights and also international arbitration for our faculty.  I find this work very gratifying.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have  you worked there? I am the Head of Reference Services at Seattle University School of Law, and I have been here since 2001.  I started working with our international law professors and learning more about international legal research about four years ago.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages? I do not, but I wish I did!

6. What is your most significant professional achievement? Our faculty includes Professor Lorraine Bannai, who was a lawyer on the Fred Korematsu coram nobis case.  In my years working with Professor Bannai I created two extensive exhibits for our library, one about Fred Korematsu and the other about Gordon Hirabayashi. To make the exhibits I did extensive research in archives, news sources, and legal documents, and brought them together with photographs, and family artifacts to tell a compelling story. The exhibits have traveled and been shown in other libraries and colleges.  I also did extensive research for Professor Bannai’s biography of Fred Korematsu. All of these experiences are my favorite professional achievements because I was able to combine extensive research, investigation, and creativity to make educational exhibits and bring an important book to light.

7. What is your biggest food weakness? Harry and David’s Moose Munch.

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance? That changes frequently.  Right now it is Juice by Lizzo.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)? I wish I could speak and read Japanese, for personal reasons (some of my family is Japanese) and because I dream about working there during a sabbatical.

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without? A hug from my 11 year old son. Better yet, a hug and a joke.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us? I only recently joined this SIS and have found the members to be very friendly and welcoming.   Thank you!

Introducing…Sola Babatunde as the September 2019 FCIL Member of the Month

sola

1. Where did you grow up?

I was born and raised in Nigeria where I also studied law. I later earned a LLM degree in Comparative and International Law from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

It was fortuitous. I had the fortune of knowing very wonderful and kind-hearted law librarians at a time when my possible career direction was in a flux. First on the list is the former library director at the Underwood Law Library, SMU, the very kind Gail M. Daly.  She was very supportive of my career. The second was Greg Ivy who succeeded her. He has always been a source of inspiration to me. And I still regard him as my informal mentor. There was also the immense support and guidance I received from Professor Yvonne Chandler. In addition to these fabulous people I received tremendous encouragement from Femi Cadmus. Allen R. Moye of DePaul Law Library graciously served as my mentor in midwifing my career as a law librarian. Mr. Moye helped me to find my feet in law librarianship. Yes, I selected law librarianship (and I am glad I did) probably because of the indirect influences of all these wonderful people who believed in me. In a sense, I am following in their footsteps. And every step of the way, it has been an exciting professional journey!

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

My view of law has always been cosmopolitan. First off, I hold a law degree from Nigeria. Nigerian law is a smorgasbord of British common law and traditional law and customs.  Second, my areas of legal specialization are: Comparative Conflict of Laws, Comparative Constitutional Laws,   Comparative Criminal Law and Procedure, and, Law of the Sea. My interest in comparative and international law is the offshoot of my legal training.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have you worked there?

Liberty University School of Law. This is my seventh year at Liberty Law!

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

My native tongue is Yoruba, a language widely spoken in the southwestern part of Nigeria but the mode of instruction in schools (in Nigeria) is English.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

Successfully managed my department’s transition to a new Integrated Library System (ILS).

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

I will always cherish banana split ice cream.

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

I am an acute introvert. No, I am not blessed with either the ability to dance or sing even if I wanted to. I will rather curl up in a quiet place with a nice literary work.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

To play the keyboard.

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

Absolutely that will be coffee.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

I hold the degree of Master of Divinity with focus on Pastoral Counseling.

AALL 2019 Recap: FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant Presentation – African Law for Everyone: AfricanLII and Laws.Africa

By: Loren Turner

Mariya

On Monday, July 15, 2019, the 2019 FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant recipient, Mariya Badeva-Bright, who leads the AfricanLII project at the University of Cape Town, South Africa (and recently co-founded Laws.Africa, a legislative commons), delivered a fantastic presentation titled “African Law for Everyone: AfricanLII and Laws.Africa.” Mariya’s presentation was a summary of her motivations and processes for gathering and digitizing African law as well as a “call to action” to law librarians worldwide for help in making African law accessible to all.

African Law for Everyone: AfricanLII and Laws.Africa

Mariya began her presentation by stating that there is no reliable, consistent, and up-to-date access to the law in many African countries – free or not.  Mariya provided several reasons for the lack of access to legal information: indifference of commercial publishers; lack of funds and skills on the local levels; poor record keeping; and low level corruption. She argued that there can be no justice without access to legal information.  When the law is not available freely and easily, judges cannot determine precedent; rich litigants have an unfair advantage.  As support, Mariya shared visual images of legislative texts in which pages were literally cut out, edited by hand, and then reinserted.  The reality, Mariya said, is that lots of African law is in such condition and this format frustrates access to justice.

Mariya explained that the AfricanLII and the Laws.Africa projects are about building an open infrastructure of African legal information with opportunity for sophisticated searches. They have to be open to anyone and offer speed, efficiency, services, growth and development.

AfricanLII was founded in 2010 to promote the role of LIIs in Africa. It now offers a federated search of over 250k documents of African legal information. Additionally, in response to user demand, it has begun to create case indices, including the Human Rights Law Index and the Commercial Law Index. It also provides a current awareness newsletter that started out as a service for judges but has expanded to anyone interested in following legal developments in African law (subscribe at the bottom of this page). Most recently, AfricanLII launched a citator service, available in beta format. It is the first visual citator in the access to law movement, but what is more remarkable is that it creates a citator service for cases that were never published in law reports and, therefore, don’t have citations!  The AfricanLII database sees about 400,000 unique users per month, 90% of which are within Africa.  Users are primarily from the justice sector (lawyers, judges, paralegals, magistrates, law students, government workers, etc.) but there is an increase in “average joes” accessing the database.

When the AfricanLII project began, there was a conscious choice to focus on gathering and digitizing cases rather than legislation.  Cases have their own value, but outdated legislation has little value.  The creators of AfricanLII had concerns about the future credibility of their project if they uploaded outdated legislation.  Plus, the reality is that in most African countries, there is no free source of consolidated, up-to-date legislation.

The Laws.Africa project developed to address the lack of freely available access to African legislation. The creators of the Laws.Africa project surveyed other country’s attempts at making legislation current and freely accessible.  They decided that the UK’s legislation.gov.uk was the model “golden” standard outside of Africa because of its rich interface and up-to-date, authoritative corpus.  Within Africa, the “golden” standards were Kenya law, an authoritative source of Kenyan legislation, and OpenBylaws.org.za, which focuses on improving access to South African by-laws.

Laws.Africa is an open source, cloud platform for efficient cost-effective consolidation and publication of African legislation.  It aims to crowdsource an open digital archive of African gazettes and use technology (in particular, Akoma Ntoso, a non-proprietary, XML markup standard for legislative documents) to consolidate legislation. In terms of processes: once a gazette is uploaded onto the Laws.Africa platform, a group of contributors (law students and law library students) extract individual Acts and identify changes to the Act over time.  A small group of reviewers check the work of the contributors (there is a two-step review process). After review, the consolidated legislation becomes available in a variety of formats.

The Laws.Africa project has already acquired and uploaded over 13,000 national gazettes.  These gazettes are available in .pdf versions through a linked sister site called Gazettes.Africa.  But, it takes a village to make a complete collection!  Unfortunately, Mariya explained, the law of Africa is not in Africa.  Instead, many African gazettes, especially historical ones, are located in libraries outside of Africa.  To continue building the collection of African gazettes and legislation on the Laws.Africa portal, Mariya and her colleagues need law librarians and digitizers in the U.S. and U.K. to donate their African gazettes to the project.  Mariya believes that crowdsourcing these gazettes is the best way to reach the goal of a complete collection.

Mariya concluded her presentation with an appeal: Join our community! Donate your gazettes!  Spread the word about the AfricanLII and Laws.Africa projects!  She received a great round of applause.

For a video of Mariya’s FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant presentation, as given at Yale Law Library subsequent to the 2019 AALL Annual Meeting, follow this link.

Introducing…Lesley Dingle as the August 2019 FCIL Member of the Month

2019.08 Lesley

1. Where did you grow up?

I was born in Mutare Zimbabwe but grew up in the small remote town of George, Western Cape, South Africa.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

I trained to be a teacher and librarian, and then trained as a lawyer. I was ultimately able to combine these interests.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

In 1997 when I was appointed to the Squire Law Library at Cambridge, having previously managed the Law Library at City University, London. I came to the Squire Library having trained in a foreign jurisdiction (mixed Roman Dutch and Common Law), and therefore had a foreign, international perspective.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have you worked there?

University of Cambridge. 22 years

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

Afrikaans, Flemish. Working knowledge of German and French.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

Founding and developing the Cambridge Eminent Scholars Archive. During this time I’ve had the privilege of interviewing many international lawyers/jurists.

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

White bread and jam

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

Cheikh  Lô with Youssou N’Dour – Set

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

To be able to play the violin well.

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

Some form of exercise.  Swimming, cycling or walking.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

I greatly value my ties with colleagues world-wide. I have made wonderful friends through FCIL activities, both home and abroad.   Similarly, my research in the course of compiling the ESA has brought home to me the variety of adversities and amazing contingencies that direct the course of most people’s careers.

 

Introducing…Abby Dos Santos as the June 2019 FCIL Member of the Month

dos santos

1. Where did you grow up? 

I was born and raised in Washington, D.C.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career? 

When I was in law school, I started working in the law library because I loved spending time in the library and learning from the librarians.  After law school, I worked closely with my firm’s law librarian.  I loved researching and the process of finding the answer, more than the answer itself.  The law librarian at the firm encouraged me to pursue a career in law librarianship, and I did!

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law? 

I have an undergraduate degree in international relations, and thought I would work in international development.  But I found a love for the law while working as an International Program Specialist for the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Commercial Law Development Program (CLDP)—providing technical assistance programs to foreign governments on topics related to international legal reform.  I further developed my interest in FCIL topics while working at Georgetown’s Wolff International & Comparative Law Library during library school and after graduating.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have  you worked there?

I currently work as the Reference Librarian at Caplin & Drysdale, in Washington, D.C.  I’ve been at Caplin & Drysdale for five years.  The firm primarily works in tax law and bankruptcy litigation, so I still use my FCIL knowledge when helping our attorneys find resources on tax treaties and other international tax issues.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

My family is originally from Brazil, so I speak fluent Portuguese.  I’m also fluent in Spanish.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

Redirecting my professional path to law librarianship and graduating from library school.  I’m very proud of graduating from law school, but as soon as I made the change to law librarianship, I knew it was the best decision for my professional career and thus has been the most significant so far.

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

BBQ

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance? 

Any Brazilian music

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

Speed reading

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

My phone (unfortunately)

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

I lived in Minnesota for college and law school, but came back to D.C. for library school.  I’m not sure how, but people tell me I still have a bit of a Minnesota accent.  So I’m probably one of the only native Washingtonians with a Minnesota accent!