2019 AALL Program Proposals due Oct. 1

deadline

There is only one week left to submit your program proposals for the 2019 AALL Conference in Washington, D.C. (see here for the call for proposals, which includes resources for creating a proposal and the AMPC’s timeline).   If you are interested in proposing a FCIL-related program for the conference or in joining someone else’s program as a consultant or speaker, please contact Dennis Sears and Loren Turner. They will help you develop your ideas, recruit speakers, and edit your proposals before submission.  There is no time to waste!

Introducing…Paul Moorman as the September 2018 FCIL Librarian of the Month

Paul Moorman

1. Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Omaha, Nebraska.  No, not on a farm, but I have detasseled corn.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

I remember first thinking about law librarianship as a career while still in law school after a particularly helpful reference librarian steered me in the right direction for a paper I was writing.  However, it wasn’t until about a decade after practicing law that I started to seriously consider making a career change.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

I’m going to blame it on my stunning diplomatic victory as the representative of the Byelorussian SSR at the 1985 Omaha Area High School Model UN.   They hook you when you’re young.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have you worked there?

I work for the USC Gould School of Law and I’ve been here for 13 years.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

German was one of my majors in college.  I used to consider myself conversationally fluent, but I’m very rusty. I’ve also taken classes in Spanish and Russian.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

Achieving continuing appointment (our equivalent of tenure).

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

Maybe you should ask what isn’t?  I indulge in salty snacks a lot more than is healthy.

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

I don’t do much dancing anymore except at weddings and if you look at my typical play lists you’ll see that I’m still stuck in the 80s, however, if I’m on the treadmill, I like to play Alors on Danse by Stromae, a Belgian who sings in French.  That song always makes me go a little faster.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

I occasionally have dreams that I can fly and when I do they make me happy so I’ll say flying.

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

Coffee and the New York Times.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

I am so lucky to have joined a profession that I love and that is filled with wonderful, smart, and generous people.   Life is fantastic when you love what you do.

Introducing…Lora Johns as the August 2018 FCIL Librarian of the Month

2018.08 lora johns

1. Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Pittsburgh, PA, where I developed my first love of all things multicultural thanks to the city’s German, Slovak, Polish, and other immigrant communities.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

Law librarianship lets me research, write, and be creative – all the things I love about the law without having to go to court.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

I have been learning world languages from the age of four and I have a degree in linguistics. My obsession with foreign languages naturally fed into my curiosity about comparative and international law.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have you worked there?

I have been working at Yale Law School since 2017.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

I speak German, Spanish, and some Czech. I have in the past studied siSwati, Swahili, Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, and Bahasa Melayu. I am currently working on improving my French.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

I am very proud to be the incoming editor of the RIPS Law Librarian Blog and to be profiled for DipLawMatic Dialogues!

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

Nutella. I am powerless before it.

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

Je ne parle pas français by Namika.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

 Someday, I aspire to be able to do a handstand walk.

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

Dancing! I am an avid social dancer—blues, tango, west coast swing, and salsa are some of my favorites.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

It is both weird and wonderful to be a librarian at the same law school that I attended.

AALL 2018 Recap: Education Committee Meeting – Program Planning for DC

capitol

By: Loren Turner

The FCIL-SIS Education Committee met at the crack of dawn (7:00 am) on Tuesday, July 17th to begin brainstorming and strategizing for the AALL 2019 conference in Washington, D.C.  We were joined by two members of the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC), Sabrina Sondhi (our official FCIL liaison to the AMPC) and Alyson Drake.  Sabrina and Alyson shared the AMPC’s timeline for gathering program ideas and proposals.  Alyson will be writing a separate DipLawMatic blog post that covers the AMPC’s timeline and goals in more detail, but in a nutshell, there is a two-step process for us to get some FCIL-related programming into the DC conference: (1) submit and up-vote your undeveloped, wild and crazy ideas to the Ideascale platform (from now until August 17th) and (2) submit your developed, professional program proposals to the AMPC (Labor Day-ish until October 1).

We have an excellent location for the next conference and the Georgetown folks who joined our meeting are already on-the-ball with fab ideas on international taxation, international trade, and international human rights.  What about you?!  What programming do you want to see in D.C. for your professional development?

Dennis Sears (searsd@law.byu.edu) and I (lturner@umn.edu) would L.O.V.E. to hear from you!  Tell us what you want to learn.  Tell us what you want to teach. Tell us who you know and what they might offer.  We will do your cold-calls.  We will help craft your wild and crazy ideas into fully-developed programs (or pre-conference workshops). We need you to help us create substantive FCIL programming for the AALL 2019 conference.  Let’s do this.

Introducing…Mariana Newman as the July 2018 FCIL Librarian of the Month

mnewmanphoto

1.Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Los Angeles, CA. I bleed Dodger blue!

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

When I was at UCLA Law, I was a research assistant for two+ years in their library research assistant program. I was fortunate to have the guidance of library director Kevin Gerson and librarian Jenny Lentz after law school during a time when I was questioning my path. They suggested law librarianship, and I felt like it might be the perfect fit. I’m also grateful for the mentorship of Richard Jost at the UW law librarianship program who helped mold me into a law librarian.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

Here at Columbia I’ve learned more about foreign, comparative, and international law librarianship through our administrative rotation system. I’ve been working with our International, Comparative, and Foreign Law Librarian, Silke Sahl, since January. I felt so lucky to be able to attend the ASIL Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in April, and listen to some fascinating speakers and meet many FCIL librarians.

4.Who is your current employer? How long have  you worked there?

I’m currently employed at the Arthur W. Diamond Law Library at Columbia Law School, and I’ve worked here for just under a year.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

I took French in high school and was an Italian minor in college, but both languages are pretty rusty now. I’d love to find more opportunities to practice speaking both!

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

I’ve only been a law librarian for a year and am in my first post-MLIS job, so right now I’d say my biggest professional achievement is making it to the other side of the first year happy that I am in this career!

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

Guacamole. I could eat my cousin Mimi’s guacamole and chips until I exploded. My coworker (and FCIL-SIS Secretary-Treasurer) Sabrina Sondhi recently shared with me some avocados her parents picked from the tree in their yard in Southern California and mailed all the way to New York. I was in heaven!

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

I am really not a dancer, but I do love to sing at the top of my lungs while driving (something I miss since moving to New York City, since singing on the subway is generally not appreciated. ;)) Paul Simon’s Graceland album is an old favorite for car singing.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

I would love to be able to sing beautifully or play the piano past my “quit lessons at age 11” level. I so admire people with natural singing talent!

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

This is perhaps a little odd, but I couldn’t live without hand lotion. Even if my hands don’t “feel” dry, they feel dry to me. I was just on a glorious short vacation on Prince Edward Island with two of my library school friends, and I picked up a bottle of “Island Potato Face & Hand Cream.” We learned that Islanders are very proud of their potato industry, and this lotion is made with 70% potato juice. I must say, my hands smell like I’ve been slicing raw potatoes after I use it, but they are feeling very soft!

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

Just that I’m grateful to be a member of such a friendly and generous professional community, and I look forward to meeting more of you at the AALL Annual Meeting this month.

 

Introducing…Caitlin Hunter as the June 2018 FCIL Librarian of the Month

hunter

1. Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Davis, a college town in northern California known for its bikes and mild hippy-dippyness. Every fall, a new crop of college students learn the hard way that you can get tickets for speeding on a bicycle and for bicycling under the influence. Davis has been in the news occasionally for its toad tunnel and experiments in squirrel birth control.

2. Why did you select law librarianship as a career?

I was a political science major as an undergraduate and, like many political science majors who don’t know what to do after college, I went to law school. Fortunately, it turned out that I loved law and especially legal research. I was excited to learn that there was an actual career focused on legal research, especially since I’d had such positive experiences working at my school library in junior high.

3. When did you develop an interest in foreign, comparative, and international law?

I have dual U.S./U.K. citizenship and I grew up making occasional visits to my Dad’s family in Scotland and spent a couple of quarters in the U.K. in college. My first exposure to lawyers growing up was reading Sarah Caudwell’s wonderful Hilary Tamar murder mysteries, starring a cast of British barristers. As a result, foreign and international law was always what interested me, even before I became interested in law librarianship.

4. Who is your current employer? How long have you worked there?

I’ve been at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles for almost 5 years and in the role of Foreign and International Law Librarian for almost a year. I’m fortunate that my boss, Laura Cadra, is extremely supportive of her staff and, knowing that I was interested in FCIL, transferred the FCIL title from herself to me.

5. Do you speak any foreign languages?

I don’t speak any foreign languages but I can read Spanish and I’m working on my French and German. I’ve also been trying to learn Hebrew and Arabic but, for now, my abilities are limited to slowly deciphering names of countries. Trying to learn new alphabets has definitely given me an even higher level respect for all of our Middle Eastern and Chinese LLMs.

6. What is your most significant professional achievement?

I feel like I’m still new to this career and I have a lot to accomplish! However, I’m proud of my work locating court documents and compiling legislative histories dating back to the 1800s for Professor Jennifer Rothman’s book The Right of Publicity. I’m also proud of my work writing human rights histories of countries for Loyola’s Inter-American Court of Human Rights Project.

7. What is your biggest food weakness?

I’m a huge fan of fried plantains. I like to kid myself that, because it’s a fruit, it’s sort of healthy.

8. What song makes you want to get up and sing/dance?

Anything cheesy and top 10.

9. What ability or skill do you most wish you had (that you don’t have already)?

Like many previous librarians of the month, I would love to improve my foreign language skills. I also have to agree with Alyson’s wish for teleportation. It would be nice to zap myself to foreign countries without a twelve hour flight!

10. Aside from the basic necessities, what is one thing you can’t go a day without?

I’m tragically addicted to Diet Pepsi and, after many attempts to quit, I’ve only succeeded in switching to decaf.

11. Anything else you would like to share with us?

I’m very excited to have joined such a welcoming and active community and I look forward to meeting more FCIL librarians at future conferences. Please feel free to reach out if there’s anything I can do for you!

Also, one of the many good things law librarianship has brought me is my cat (pictured), who was found hiding in the bushes by the library. Today, she spends most of her time lounging around the house and trying to eat any book within reach.

FCIL-SIS Book Discussion Group to Meet Again in Baltimore This Summer

By Susan GualtierKorematsu Cover

Over the past several years, the FCIL-SIS Book Discussion Group, started by Dan Wade in in 2014, has become a popular informal addition to the AALL Annual Meeting’s FCIL conference programming.  Each year, we select a book to read in advance of the conference and meet during the conference to enjoy a book discussion, lunch or snacks, and each other’s fine company.

This year, the group will meet on Monday, July 16, at 12:30.  As in past years, we will meet in the Registration Area, and will find a table or small room from there.  The event will be BYO lunch or snacks.

This year’s book selection is In the Shadow of Korematsu: Democratic Liberties and National Security, by Eric K. Yamamoto.  Professor Yamamoto is the Fred T. Korematsu Professor of Law and Social Justice at the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai`i. He is nationally and internationally recognized for his legal work and scholarship on civil procedure, as well as national security and civil liberties, and civil rights and social justice, with an emphasis on reconciliation initiatives and redress for historic injustice.  The following book description appears on the Oxford University Press website:

The national security and civil liberties tensions of the World War II mass incarceration link 9/11 and the 2015 Paris-San Bernardino attacks to the Trump era in America – an era darkened by accelerating discrimination against and intimidation of those asserting rights of freedom of religion, association and speech, and an era marked by increasingly volatile protests. This book discusses the broad civil liberties challenges posed by these past-into-the-future linkages highlighting pressing questions about the significance of judicial independence for a constitutional democracy committed both to security and to the rule of law. What will happen when those profiled, detained, harassed, or discriminated against under the mantle of national security turn to the courts for legal protection? How will the U.S. courts respond to the need to protect both society and fundamental democratic values of our political process? Will courts fall passively in line with the elective branches, as they did in Korematsu v. United States, or serve as the guardian of the Bill of Rights, scrutinizing claims of “pressing public necessity” as justification for curtailing fundamental liberties?

These queries paint three pictures portrayed in this book. First, they portray the present-day significance of the Supreme Court’s partially discredited, yet never overruled, 1944 decision upholding the constitutional validity of the mass Japanese American exclusion leading to indefinite incarceration – a decision later found to be driven by the government’s presentation of “intentional falsehoods” and “willful historical inaccuracies” to the Court. Second, the queries implicate prospects for judicial independence in adjudging Harassment, Exclusion, Incarceration disputes in contemporary America and beyond. Third, and even more broadly for security and liberty controversies, the queries engage the American populace in shaping law and policy at the ground level by placing the courts’ legitimacy on center stage. They address how critical legal advocacy and organized public pressure targeting judges and policymakers – realpolitik advocacy – at times can foster judicial fealty to constitutional principles while promoting the elective branches accountability for the benefit of all Americans. This book addresses who we are as Americans and whether we are genuinely committed to democracy governed by the Constitution.

This year’s book selection promises to foster a rich discussion, and we look forward to welcoming both past book group members and new members interested in joining the discussion.  Again, this is an informal event, and RSVPs are not necessary; however, please feel free to let us know if you are planning to participate, so that we can get a general head count ahead of time.  Any questions or comments can be emailed to Susan Gualtier at sgua@law.upenn.edu.  We look forward to seeing you all in Baltimore for another great book discussion!