AALL 2017 Recap: Authors of the Mexican Law and Legal Research Guide win the Reynolds & Flores Publication Award!

The Reynolds and Flores Publication Award is named after the authors of the Foreign Law Guide, a source that we all gratefully consult on daily basis. This award recognizes FCIL-SIS member(s) who have created a publication that enhances the professional knowledge and capabilities of law librarians. Winning publications may be print, digital, or electronic initiatives. Thus, journal articles, treatises, symposia papers, digitization projects, websites, databases, and ebooks are all eligible for consideration. This year, all authors of the Mexican Law and Legal Research Guide won the Reynolds & Flores Publication Award: Bianca T. Anderson, Marisol Floren-Romero, Julienne E. Grant, Jootaek Lee, Lyonette Louis-Jacques, Teresa M. Miguel-Stearns, Jonathan Pratter, and Sergio Stone. Julienne and Jonathan, as co-editors of the Guide, accepted the award on behalf of the group.

The Guide was most recently published in March of  2016 in Volume 35, Issue 1, of the Legal Reference Services Quarterly.  It covers all types of  primary sources of law and secondary legal literature, including international agreements, state gazettes, law journals, textbooks, and monographs.  Additionally, it filled a gap in the literature: it contains an extensive bibliography of secondary literature in English on Mexican law and legal research, which is not found in other research guides or treatises on Mexican law and legal research. Since its publication, it has received approximately 500 views (on the Taylor & Francis platform that hosts Legal Reference Services Quarterly) and over 200 SSRN downloads.  

The Guide is a significant contribution to our field in terms of its content, but it is also a fantastic example of the quality of work we can achieve when we collaborate with each other for the benefit of our profession.  Congratulations to all!

#AALL2016 Recap: The FCIL-SIS Reynolds & Flores Publication Award

By Lucie Olejnikova

Each year, in addition to the Newest FCIL Member and Spirit of the FCIL Awards, we also give out the Reynolds and Flores Award (“The Thomas H. Reynolds and Arturo A. Flores FCIL-SIS Publication Award”). This Award is named after the authors of the Foreign Law Guide, a source that we all gratefully consult on daily basis. This award recognizes an FCIL-SIS member(s) who have significantly contributed to the professional development of their AALL colleagues during any given year. The publication may be print, digital, or an electronic initiative which in turn may include journal articles, treatises, symposia papers, digitization projects, websites, databases, and e-books – to name a few. This year, we are honored to recognize our colleague – Professor Emeritus Timothy G. Kearley.

timothykearley smTimothy Kearley was the Director of the Law Library and Centennial Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Wyoming. Before coming to the University of Wyoming, he was the FCIL Librarian and Associate Director of the Law Library at the University of Illinois College of Law and then Director of the Law Library and Professor of Law at Louisiana State University Law Center. Professor Kearley was instrumental in creating the FCIL-SIS and served as its Chair in 1989/90.

Among Prof. Kearly’s interests is undoubtedly the fascinating field of Roman law, which extends to his publications, including the Blume’s Annotated Justinian Code Website, which he edited. Further, his article “Justice Fred H. Blume and the Translation of Justinian’s Codex” will appear in Cambridge’s The Codex of Justinian: A New Annotated Translation, to be published this coming fall.

Over his career, he has contributed many articles to Law Library Journal, including his most recent “From Rome to the Restatement: S.P. Scott, Fred Blume, Clyde Pharr, and Roman Law in Early Twentieth-Century America” in the Winter 2016 issue. “This article describes how the classical past, including Roman law and a classics-based education, influenced elite legal culture in the United States and university-educated Americans into the twentieth century and helped to encourage [early American translators such as] Scott, Blume, and Pharr to labor for many years on their English translations of ancient Roman law.”

For this contribution, which greatly enhances the professional knowledge of law librarians in the area of Roman law and legal history, we congratulate Prof. Kearley on receiving the FCIL-SIS Reynolds & Flores Publication Award!

For those of you who have not had a chance to hear him speak at this year program titled “Roman Law, Roman Order, and Restatements”, keep an eye out for the AALL recording.