Creating Training Resources for GOALI

By Latia Ward

GOALItitleslide

Title slide from the GOALI Basic Course Tutorial.

Purpose of GOALI

Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI) is a project of the International Labour Organization (ILO) (a United Nations agency) and its partners which include publishers and academic institutions.  One of these partners is Cornell University Law Library where I work as a Research Services Librarian and Diversity Fellow.  As part of my work I have created how-to resources for conducting research with GOALI.

The purpose of GOALI is to facilitate access to legal information for researchers in the Global South.  To that end, GOALI aligns with Goal 16 of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals:  “Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies.”  Researchers have access to GOALI through their institutions and the Research4Life website lists nations eligible for GOALI.  In their paper entitled Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI) – A New Legal Training Resource for Developing Countries, Richelle Van Snellenberg, Unit Head of the ILO Library and Edit Horvàth, User and Outreach Officer of the ILO Library note that GOALI is about more than providing information resources to researchers in the Global South, but also about closing the “knowledge gap in academic research” between nations of wealth and nations of more modest means.  The facilitators of GOALI aim to close the “knowledge gap” through the provision of information resources from authoritative and current sources.  In addition, Van Snellenberg and Horvàth contextualize the implementation of GOALI within the Free Access to Law Movement and its Declaration on Free Access to Law which states that “Public legal information from all countries and international institutions is part of the common heritage of humanity.”  Included within this definition of public legal information are both primary and secondary sources of law.

GOALI is one of the five programs or platforms for information that the Research4Life partnership has produced.  Research4Life is a partnership of WHO, FAO, UNEP, WIPO, ILO, Cornell University, Yale University, the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers, and other international publishers.  The four other platforms for information are Hinari (health research), AGORA (agricultural research), and OARE (environmental research), ARDI (development and innovation research).  GOALI, the newest platform, became available for use on March 6, 2018.

Through GOALI, researchers may access journals, books, databases, and reference sources.  GOALI includes resources from the legal field as well as other fields within the social sciences.  An example of resources provided by GOALI include open access resources which cover a variety of jurisdictions such as African Journals Online (AJOL) and the ILO’s NATLEX database of national labor, social security, and human rights legislation.

Guides for GOALI

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Screenshot from the GOALI Tutorial Video.  Image of computer monitor from Pixaby.

During the spring of 2018, I created a video, tutorials (which consist of slides showing research paths), and exercises on how to use the GOALI database.  My goal in creating the video (for which I included closed captions), the tutorials, and exercises was to provide a step-by-step manual on how to conduct research within GOALI.

When I created the tutorials and exercises for GOALI, I began by familiarizing myself with the platform by searching for resources and reviewing training materials that other information specialists had developed for Research4Life’s AGORA platform.  I reviewed AGORA exercises and modules for the AGORA Portal and Summon Searching to use as templates (although I had to research and create exercises and tutorials specific to GOALI).

The first tutorial and set of exercises are called the GOALI Basic Course.  In the GOALI Basic Course, I explain how to browse the entire GOALI collection, how to locate specific journals, publishers, and subjects, and how to find specific citations.  In the second tutorial and set of exercises, I explain how to do a basic Summon search, refine the search, and conduct an advanced search within GOALI.  In the third tutorial and set of exercises, I explain how to access publishers’ websites from the GOALI platform, identify general features on publishers’ websites, and how to use these features to find articles.  In the GOALI video, I include demonstrations on how to find journals by title, language, and publisher and how to access full-text books.

News about GOALI

The GOALI Launch Event of March 6, 2018 is available on YouTube and includes additional information on why GOALI was created and commentary from Research4Life Partners.  To keep up with current news regarding GOALI, follow #GOALI on Twitter (look for posts related to @R4LPartnership and #Research4Life as there are many posts related to soccer and people named Ali) and visit the ILO’s GOALI website often.

From the Reference Desk: Is There An Annotated European Union Code?

By Amy Flick

“Is there an annotated European Union Code? I have an EU directive, and I need to find some cases that interpret it.”

First, having just taught a class on U.S. statutory legal research, I’m thrilled that a student thought to use an annotated code to find cases interpreting legislation.

There isn’t a European Union code, not exactly. But the European Union does have a classification system for its law, and there are sources for finding cases on a particular EU directive, from the European Court of Justice and from national courts.

The student was looking for cases on Directive 98/44/EC on patents for biotechnological inventions.

Although European Union law isn’t codified, the closest thing to a codification would be the Directory of Legal Acts on EUR-Lex. It arranges EU legislation in force by subject and includes consolidated acts incorporating amendments. Directive 98/44/EC is classified with Intellectual Property legislation at 17.20, but with a general heading at 17 of “Law relating to Undertakings,” I’m not sure I would have found it without already having found the Directory Classification. There is also the EuroVoc thesaurus for browsing legislation (and caselaw) by subject. Either the thesaurus terms or the Directory codes can be used in the EUR-Lex Advanced Search, along with text and other criteria (including type of legislation). In this case, a text search for “biotechnology AND patents” worked just as well.

The student already had the citation for Directive 98/44/EC, but I recommended that he look at the Directorate-General on Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs. The European Commission’s executive agencies are a great source for finding current legislation that they administer, with links to EUR-Lex. The DG’s page on Protection of Biotechnological Inventions includes the Biotech Directive with a summary, reports, and related documents, plus a State of Play of the Implementation of Directive 98/44/EC that has dates and citations for national legislation implementing the directive.

Summaries of EU Legislation on EUR-Lex are also a good way to find legislation by subject, including by general topic or to search. Again, a search for “biotechnology and patents” retrieved the summary for Directive 98/44/EC.

With a directive citation in hand, my student can find cases interpreting the directive. The EUR-Lex Document Information for the directive includes a “Relationship between documents” section that has links to Court of Justice judgments as published in the Official Journal of the European Communities.

The European Court of Justice’s CURIA site has an advanced search page with a field for “references to case law or legislation,” including directives by number. It even allows searching for pinpoint references to paragraphs within the directive.

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Since directives require that EU member states implement them with national legislation, there are also national laws and cases in national courts on the directive.

Once a directive is found in EUR-Lex, the links in the left navigational side bar include “National Transposition.” These National Transpositions by Member State provide the citations to each member state’s implementing laws for the directive. He could also use EUR-Lex’s Advanced Search Form. Choose National Transposition as the collection and search by directive number (1998 and 44).

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For this particular directive, that “State of Play” from the Directorate-General cites national implementing legislation. If a Google search doesn’t retrieve the cited legislation, the student could use the Foreign Law Guide database or the Law Library of Congress’ Guide to Law Online to find sources for national legislation.  There’s also the European Union’s N-Lex gateway to search for national legislation in N-Lex with the directive citation.

Back to looking for cases interpreting the directive, the EUR-Lex advanced search can be used to search national caselaw as well. He could use the same EUR-Lex Advanced Search Form, choose National Case Law as the collection, and enter the directive number in the Instruments Cited field.

The European Union’s Association of the Councils of State and Supreme Administrative Jurisdictions has its own Dec.Nat. database for searching national decisions on European Union law. The search page includes a field for Provision of European Union Law for searching by directive number, or other EU legislation. The results list includes country, date, title of the case, and parties, with case details including a citation to the national law and link to related ECJ judgements.

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So, the European Union doesn’t have annotated code, not is there an “EU Code.” But it does have subject resources for finding legislation. And it offers multiple ways through EUR-Lex and other EU databases to find cases that interpret an EU directive, and national legislation implementing the directive.

And my thanks to Alison Shea for sharing her European Union expertise!

Go-To Resources for the Non-FCIL Librarian

Int_lComArb_Wordle_Word_Cloud__on_Navy__2016By Janet Kearney & Michelle Penn

Hello DipLawMatic Dialogues readers! This is the first in a set of posts from Michelle and Janet on FCIL for non-FCIL librarians; the next post will focus on teaching. Michelle and Janet are both from Fordham Law Library, where Michelle is Faculty Services Librarian and Janet just made the leap from Reference Librarian to FCIL Law Librarian. Thanks for having us!

Where can I find Singapore cases on surrogacy? How do I cite check this Russian statute?  How do I find the main sources of international humanitarian law? As librarians, we often receive questions that we don’t know the answers to. What sets us apart is the ability to strategize and efficiently learn the answer. So for those of us who dabble in FCIL or only rarely get questions or are just interested, here’s a collection – a research guide of research guides and a couple of databases. While this is from the perspective of two academic librarians, these should get you started and answer the most frequently asked questions regardless of your work environment!

Research Guides:

GlobaLex – For those of you on the FCIL-SIS listserv, you have probably seen the great (and frequent!) updates to Globalex. From the publisher,       “The guides and articles published are written by scholars well known in their respective fields and are recommended as a legal resource by universities, library schools, and legal training courses.” What does this mean for users? It provides the location of various documents, but it also puts the documents in the context of their legal system. This is helpful for both those incredibly specific (and seemingly random) journal student requests and questions with broad strokes. “I need Icelandic adoption laws” – Globalex will get you started. “I want to establish a standard as customary international law” – Globalex will help you there too! Available for free online, http://www.nyulawglobal.org/globalex/index.html.

UN Library Research Guides, are unsurprisingly, wonderful resources for areas of law involving the United Nations. The researcher should keep in mind though, that the guides apply to United Nations resources and are thus not complete regarding international law as a whole. For example, the resource guides on international law may inadvertently give the novice researcher the impression that international law begins and ends with the United Nations. Available for free online, http://research.un.org/en?b=s&group_id=2087.

Databases

The World Legal Information Institution, (World LII), is home to a number of free and non-profit databases helpful to the FCIL researcher, developed by the Australasian Legal Information Institution, British and Irish Legal Information Institute, Canadian Legal Information Institute, Cornell’s Legal Information Institute, Pacific Islands Legal Information Institute, and Wits University School of Law. The searchable databases include case law, legislation, treaties, law reform, law journals, and specialist subject databases from 123 jurisdictions. Though the interface may not be as flashy as those of paid resources, it allows for an impressive level of advanced Boolean searching, including proximity searching. Note that coverage and currency can vary widely by jurisdiction. http://www.worldlii.org/databases.html

vLex Global is similar to World LII, but it is a subscription resource. It also contains case law and statutes, occasional regulations, and journal articles from over 100+ jurisdictions. The added value comes from a wider variety of materials such as forms, administrative decisions, regulations, and legislation from countries that can be harder to navigate, especially when you do not speak the language. What really gets me excited about this is the translation tool and the ability to navigate collections in my native language – sure I can use Google translate and try to parse things out, but this eliminates some of the guesswork. Translations, although not perfect, can be made between multiple languages and is not limited to English. https://vlex.com/p/vlex-global/

For primary and secondary source research, HeinOnline is home to many databases helpful to the foreign and international legal researcher. One of the most useful databases is the World Treaty Library, which includes over 160,000 treaties from 1648 to the present, as well as related articles and publications. While much of the material on Hein’s World Constitutions Illustrated is available on free websites, the database is still a useful resource, consolidating constitutional information in one place with quality English translations. For secondary sources, Hein’s Index to Foreign and Legal Periodicals is the the go-to index for over 500 legal journals. https://home.heinonline.org/

IALL 2018 Recap: Robot Law

By Mike McArthur

We were privileged to hear Ms. Mady Delvaux-Stehres of the European Parliament provide some insight into the recent discussion and drafting of the report on Civil Law Rules on Robotics. Since she and the other members of the working committee didn’t have backgrounds in robotics, they relied on a team of specialists to get them up to speed. After about a year of work, she began drafting of the report.

The first issue the committee needed to address was the definition of robot they would use in the report. They wanted to encompass the wide application of uses, but ultimately excluded robots used for military application, as that would have ushered in a whole other level of considerations.

Ms. Delvaux-Stehres outlined 5 major themed challenges that faced the committee:

(1) Safety and security, encompassing cyberhacking and cybersecurity, are the most critical issues for the European Union.

(2) Data protection and privacy is still a concern, even with GDCP in force. She explained that it is yet to be seen how effective this new law will address advances in AI.

(3) Ethical considerations related to reliability, transparency, accountability and fairness are also a concern. So much data is fed into the system with machine learning, but there still needs to be a way to determine how reliable the results are. This process often happens in a black box, though, and the more the committee delved into the topic, the more questions that seemed to emerge.

(4) Jobs and skills are being impacted as well. The committee were not concerned about the winners, but were concerned about how society would take care of the losers. Education is effective but slow and there are still many resistant to change. On a side note, she mentioned she introduced the idea of taxing robots, but it was quickly dismissed by a majority of representatives.

(5) Finally, specialists from a broad range of disciplines would need to be brought into the discussion, and they could not just rely on computer scientists. Examples she provided included lawyers and philosophers.

The talk then pivoted to issues related to liability. The current framework has limitations and the definitions are insufficient per Delvaux-Stehres. Using an autonomous car as an example, she mentioned that the types of damage that could occur far exceed the main category of product liability, namely defective products, and even that is narrowly defined. Summing up the government’s responsibility, she further explained that increasingly sophisticated products will require a very large safety net.

Further issues that the committee discussed included the question of obligatory insurance, which would be challenging to set rates for due to a lack of available data. Also, the concept of e-personality, or evolving algorithms, and whether liability would be assigned to the developer. And lastly, the speaker concluded by positing a few rhetorical questions. How do we need to change to make sure that AI will not just benefit the wealthy few, but society at large? How can we limit and control the mega-tech companies? Definitely topics that would require entire conferences of their own.

IALL 2018 Preconference Workshop on Library Innovation & Robot Usage

By Mike McArthur

TORY and Presenters

TORY, Ms. Juja Chakarova, and Dr. Johannes Travert at the IALL Preconference Workshop on Library Innovation & Robot Usage.

The 2018 IALL Annual Course kicked-off its pre-conference workshop at the Max Planck Institute for Procedural Law (MPI) in Luxembourg on Sept. 30th. The presenters included Ms. Juja Chakarova, the Head of the Library at MPI, robot designer Dr. Johannes Trabert of MetraLabs GmbH, and TORY, the inventory control robot previously used at the MPI library.

To frame the presentation, Ms. Chakarova began by explaining that the discussion would be limited to innovations that were relevant to libraries, specifically those dealing with text, letters, and languages while largely excluding those related to media, art, and other fields. She then continued by describing some of the tools that have impacted libraries throughout Europe, from the development of the typewriter in the late 1800s, to the 1960s and the introduction of automation provided by the PDP-11 line of “mini-computers.” Pointing to the Apollo 11 experiments, she contrasted the capacities of computing at the time where NASA computers ran at 40 kHz and utilized 64 kB of memory. A typical laptop today is hundreds of times more powerful, running at 2.6 Ghz and using multiple GB of memory. It isn’t a stretch to say that the entire computing power of the Apollo mission is eclipsed by a simple Google search.

After some more descriptions of technological advancement related to Moore’s Law and the disruptive influence brought by “increasingly capable machines” in Richard Susskind’s book “The Future of Professions,” Ms. Chakarova finished by bringing it back to innovation as it relates to librarians. Mentioning how card catalogs and loan cards once revolutionized the user experience, she shared that her library had directly tackled their inventory issues through the use of an innovative robot.

Dr. Trabert stepped forward to explain. Having previously worked at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, he had returned to Germany to work for a company that develops mobile service robots, mostly to do simple tasks such as to guide customers to products in a store. His company worked with the MPI library to design a robot that would automate their inventory control functions using RFID, which has replaced the need for visual, camera-based functions. The goal, he said, was to free the librarians for work they were more suited for, especially interaction with patrons.

The robot that MPI had used for setting up its inventory control is named TORY. Using a set of programs, maps, and sensors, TORY is capable of autonomous movement around the library even when patrons are present, which can sometimes be tricky as standard safety features must be robust enough to let it operate around untrained people. Dr. Trabert had graciously brought TORY back to the library for a live demonstration. A table with numerous books had been set up on a card table at the front of the room and TORY quickly rounded the table while a list of titles and a tile count streamed onto the projector screen.

At this point the audience peppered the presenters with questions:

  • Does it work with compact shelving? Answer: It is surprisingly mobile, but can’t turn the crank for you…)
  • What do students do to TORY? Answer: We have a very responsible patron base so no hats, stickers, or other pranks.
  • How much do these cost? Answer: This model is about 30,000 euros and there is no leasing model yet.
  • What about a warranty? Answer: There are of course many maintenance packages.
  • What happens if there is an error? Answer: Robots like TORY have an emergency signal they send out when their sensors are blocked.

We also discovered that to process the 35,000 volumes in the collection, a few students were hired to place RFID strips in each book, which was completed over the course of two months.

Ms. Chakarova finished up by explaining that in countries like Japan where the population is more inclined to trust robots, they are being used in a wide variety of capacities. And while there is a general fear that automation will displace our jobs, an informal survey of the audience found that almost 90% were not afraid. This wrapped-up the pre-conference workshop.

New FCIL Librarian Series: Creating a New Research Guide

By Jessica Pierucci

This is the fifth in a series of posts documenting my first year as a foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) librarian. I started in this newly-created role at the UCI Law Library in July 2017. The aim of this series is to document my year in the hope of inspiring aspiring FCIL librarians to join the field (and hopefully not scaring them away!) by discussing one librarian’s experience entering the field.

When I attended the 2017 AALL Annual Meeting a few weeks into my new job last year, I ended up at a table next to Marci Hoffman at an FCIL-SIS interest group meeting. She provided some excellent wisdom I took to heart. She advised me to create guides on FCIL topics as a way of getting to know the field. Creating a guide requires thinking in depth about how to start and organize a particular type of research in order to convey that to other researchers.

Following Ms. Hoffman’s words of wisdom, I’m pleased to have added a brand new Foreign Law Research guide to the UCI Law Libraries series of LibGuides. This guide is the result of reviewing established guides (most notably Georgetown’s fantastic guide), consulting books on the topic (most notably the Hoffman & Rumsey Coursebook), responding to and assisting with faculty and student questions on foreign law, and identifying some of the sources requested through Int-Law as time permitted throughout this past year.

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This guide’s target audience is UCI Law students who are either collecting sources for work on a law journal or engaging in independent foreign law research for a class, to write a student note, or just for fun. I also created this guide for fellow UCI Law librarians to assist students with this research. Students working on our newest law journal, the UC Irvine Journal of International, Transnational, and Comparative Law, and students working on certain articles in the UC Irvine Law Review, may be tasked with collecting foreign law sources for the first time. This was a relatively frequent question on my reference desk shifts last year, so I thought a new guide to aid students in this process, along with added information for those wanting to do more than locate a source, would be a great addition to the library’s guides.

One of the most interesting aspects of creating this guide was considering which aspects of foreign law research are universal and which aspects are country-specific. Through this guide, I aim to share the universal information in digestible chunks and continuously remind users to locate country-specific resources if needed, particularly if they move beyond source collection. Considering how to create streamlined, but comprehensive steps and how to select resources for source collection across countries was a valuable learning process that I believe will improve my reference desk interactions on this topic. I’m sure I’ll continue to edit the guide and my approach as I put the guide into action and see how it works in practice.

I’m tremendously thankful to all the librarians who created the resources already out there that I was able to draw upon in creating this guide. As part of the learning process, I would encourage other newer FCIL librarians to similarly spend time with established resources and then use what they learn to create their own guides. Creating a guide from scratch forced me to consider how to convey foreign law research topics in a manner that makes sense to me and I hope will make sense to UCI Law students. This pushed me to understand the topic in a deeper way than I believe would have been possible without having to put my understanding of the topic onto virtual paper.

ASIL 2018 Recap: New Technologies in International Criminal and Human Rights Investigations and Fact-Finding

By Susan Gualtier

On Thursday, April 5th, I attended a panel entitled “New Technologies in International Criminal and Human Rights Investigations and Fact-Finding.”  The panel explored the increasing use of new technologies, such as social media, satellite data, mobile phone apps, and drone technology, in human rights fact-finding, particularly where sites are inaccessible or pose an especially high risk to human rights investigators.

The panelists first discussed their work with various technologies.  For example, Brad Samuels, of SITU Research, works with visual, panoramic, and geospatial representations that must be optimized for use in court. As Mr. Samuels explained, there might be many videos that capture the same moment in time, but from different viewpoints.  Part of his job is to use these videos to create an event reconstruction.  Jonathan Drake, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, explained that part of the AAAS’s mission is to engage scientists in human rights and to further the use of science in advancing human rights.  The AAAS has performed grave site analysis and environmental analysis, using images to uncover lies by foreign governments.  They are currently considering how to integrate drones into human rights fact-finding and advancement.

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The panel then discussed issues surrounding the use of new and emerging technologies in human rights fact-finding.  For example, the use of smartphones to take videos and post them to social media has allowed more crimes to be exposed.  At the same time, it can be difficult to verify the accuracy of the information contained in the videos.  One way this problem has been addressed is through mobile phone apps, such as the eyeWitness to Atrocities app, which collects location data on the user from three different sources, provides a verified chain of custody for the video, and makes the user’s footage not editable.  However, there are benefits and drawbacks to such app technology.  On the one hand, it helps human rights workers to overcome access issues in situations where on-the-ground fact-finding would be impossible.  It also gives agency to the victims of the atrocities, rather than taking an imperialist, top down approach.  Nonetheless, the panelists all noted the need to be cautious when it comes to use of these apps.  While initial users have acted in good faith while generating evidence, several of the panelists expressed their concern that later users may have less noble intentions than the early adopters.  The panelists also noted the problem of visual bias (the preference for video representations, even in fields like politics where video cannot adequately capture much of the overall picture).  Scientific studies suggest that visual bias and the use of video evidence can introduce a host of problems into the courtroom.  What happens if we move toward mostly visual evidence, but that evidence is not necessarily representative of the situation as a whole?

Despite these and other issues, the types of evidence that can be captured using technology are extremely valuable to lawyers, judges, and other players in field of human rights work.  Technology has led to better results in investigations by providing access to witnesses and to physical documents that would otherwise be impossible to obtain.  It allows judges to see the violence for themselves when travel to the site of an atrocity would be impossible.  It even allows for more complete crime scene investigations.  Nonetheless, the panel urged that we proceed with caution.  There will need to be some guidelines or minimal standards for technology-generated evidence so that it will be admissible in court.  Tech designers are still much more risk-friendly, and perhaps too willing to let technologies fail, than are human rights attorneys, who need to protect witnesses and victims and to meet the demands of tribunals.  Moreover, we must remember that not everyone has access to technology; many of the places where we find human rights offenses are also places where people simply do not have access to mobile phones, apps, and social media.  And some of the worst accountability issues occur where there’s awareness anyway.  Ultimately, it is critical that those using the new technologies remain aware of its limitations.  We should not overemphasize the technological tools just because they are “cool.”  In the end, we should use them to bolster cases that are already based on traditional human rights fact-finding.