European Law IG Needs Your Feedback and Suggestions

On behalf of the European Law Interest Group, we would like to share a short, four question survey with you, in hopes of getting some ideas of the types of projects you’d like to see the European Law Interest Group undertake in the future.   The IG’s hope is to address the needs of both those who specialize in European Law, as well as those who don’t specialize, but are still interested in specific programming in European Law or who receive the occasional research question related to European Law.

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To take the survey, go here.  Thank you for your help in developing future programming for FCIL-SIS!

The survey is anonymous, but if it sparks any ideas you’d like to share in greater detail, or you’d like to volunteer to help out with any of the ideas mentioned in the survey, please contact Erin Gow, chair of the European Law Interest Group, at erin.gow@louisville.edu.

 

Recap: Jurisdictions Interest Groups Joint Meeting

By Alyson Drake

This year’s Jurisdictions Interest Groups Joint Meeting was a fantastic opportunity to hear from our FCIL-SIS colleagues on interesting topics and interest group projects.

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jenJennifer Allison from the European Law Interest Group kicked off the meeting with an informative discussion of recent changes to German asylum law.  First, Jennifer explained that asylum for the politically persecuted is a constitutional right in Germany, under Grundgesetz article 16a.  She highlighted three 2016 laws related to German asylum law:

  • The Data Exchange Improvement Act, aimed at improving procedures for the exchange of data between government groups and other entities dealing with refugees;
  • The Act Introducing an Accelerated Asylum Procedure, which explains how accelerated asylum procedure will work for those cases where a fraudulent application for asylum is expected or where there’s a potential risk to the safety of the country by an applicant; and
  • The Act Simplifying Expulsion of Foreign Criminals and the Broadened Suspension of Refugee Recognition for Criminal Asylum Applicant, which amends earlier asylum laws.

She also discussed the Integration Act, the latest asylum legislation, which has yet to come into force and encourages asylum seekers and grantees to participate in training programs to help integrate them into German culture.

german law guideJennifer also provided a handout with various German law sources and other helpful sources, which can be found on her German Law Research Guide; it includes a section on German asylum law.  She also highly recommended following Jenny Gesley, who is the German Law Specialist at the Library of Congress, on Twitter for updates relating to German law.  One other resource she highly recommended is the Linguee German-English Dictionary, which gives good examples of legal terminology in context.

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Next up were Juice Lee and Steven Alexander de Costa, speaking on behalf of the Latin America Interest Group.  They presented the IG’s progress on the “Guide to Legal Research on Cuba.”  The guide will include information on Cuba’s history and Cuban law.  It will also include both Spanish and English language resources. The expected completion date of the guide is September 1st, 2016, and the group is still deciding on where to publish the guide after completion.

Steven discussed a little about his experiences working on the legal history portion of the guide.  He explained that the project was unique because materials relating to Cuba’s legal history weren’t widely available, particularly in English.  He noted that he learned some interesting facts about Cuba’s legal history, including that the modern history of Cuba began with the 1959 revolution, and that the legal system entwines both civil and socialist law, as well as some common law.  Interestingly, Cuban law still owes a lot to Spanish civil codes.

cuban lawIn the discussion that followed the update, it was noted that LLMC is currently working on digitizing approximately 200 Cuban materials, and that the National Library of Cuba has joined to cause and is helping find rare titles and more materials.  Teresa Miguel-Stearns also briefly discussed her recent trip to Cuba.

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The third speaker was Yemisi Dina from the Africa Interest Group, updating the group on completing phase one of her the South Western Nigeria digitization project.  One recent development is that she’s created a blog, digesting cases before customary courts in two cities in South Western Nigeria.

Yemisi shared several observations with the group:

  • yemisiCustomary law has a future in the legal system of Nigeria and other African countries. Customary courts are disorganized, but the government is interested. Yemisi noted that the government put a structure together for her to visit.
  • The resolution process is open to everyone, not just certain demographic groups. Yemisi observed that educated people are using the customary courts to resolve their disputes.
  • The majority of issues before the customary courts are divorce; rent; and child custody. Yemisi mentioned that land disputes used to be before the courts a great deal, but that those disputes have died down.
  • The courts face several challenges, including financial issues, as they are not funded by the government; limited resources, such as courts having only one staff person working at the court; and a lack of technology.

Yemisi welcomes comments about and suggestions for her project.

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perkinsFinally, Steven Perkins from the Indigenous Peoples Interest Group gave an interesting talk on some of the issues regarding DNA testing of Indigenous Peoples.

First, Steven discussed some of the different types of DNA testing that can take place, including the testing that can be done to determine the ethnic groups from which a person gets their DNA.  Next, Steven provided a brief history of the relationship between scientists and Native American tribes, namely that scientists have been analyzing tribe blood over the last 50 years, but that some challenges arose in how scientists were using their samples.  Scientists conducted research beyond the scope of what they told the tribes would be done, gave samples out to other scientists, and moved around the blood samples to different schools.  As such, the tribe had to set some boundaries and recollect the blood that had been passed around.  As such, tribes have created a guide to decide how to approach these situations.  The guide is found on the National Congress of American Indians website.  Most notably, the tribes keep the data and keep custody of the samples, and have procedures for determining whether a person is part of a particular tribe.

Thank you to all the speakers for presenting such a robust Jurisdictions IG meeting!

FCIL-SIS Jurisdictions Interest Groups To Meet On Sunday

FCIL-SIS invites all AALL conference attendees to join us for our Jurisdictions Interest Groups Joint Meeting this Sunday, from 12:30pm to 2:00pm, in the Hyatt-Water Tower Room.  The program will include substantive presentations from several of our interest groups, as well as 15 minutes at the end of the meeting for each group to discuss their plans for the coming year.

The agenda for the meeting is as follows:

SUNDAY July 17, 2016

12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

FCIL-SIS Jurisdictions IG Joint Meeting (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, Indigenous Peoples, Customary & Religious Law, Roman Law) (Hyatt-Water Tower)

Meeting Topics:

  • Welcome and Intro (Susan Gualtier, Louisiana State University School of Law Library) – 5 minutes
  • European Law: Recent Developments in German Law Related to Asylum and Refugees: A Brief Overview for Law Librarians (Jennifer Alison, Harvard Law School Library) – 20 minutes
  • Latin America: Cuban Legal Research Guide (Julienne Grant, Loyola University Chicago Law Library, et al.) – 10 minutes
  • Africa: Updates of the Digitization Case Law Project from South Western Nigeria (Yemisi Dina, Osgood Hall Law School Library) – 20 minutes
  • Indigenous Peoples: Indigenous Peoples and DNA Testing: Friend or Foe? (Steven Perkins, Greenberg Traurig, LLP) – 20 minutes
  • Individual Interest Groups business meetings – 15 minutes

Everyone is welcome to attend the presentations and to check out our interest groups, so please spread the word to anyone interested in these areas of foreign law.  FCIL-SIS looks forward to seeing you there!

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Forthcoming: “Guide to Legal Research in Cuba,” By the Latin American Law Interest Group

The Latin American Law Interest Group is excited to announce its forthcoming publication, “Guide to Legal Research in Cuba” (edited by Julienne Grant, Sergio Stone, and Marisol Florén-Romero.)

The purpose of the Guide is to provide a snapshot of Cuban law and legal research as they exist in the political fluidity of the moment.  Historical context will also be included. Research for the project in general has been painstakingly difficult. Both Spanish and English-language resources will be covered.

Twelve authors have contributed to the project, which is currently in the editorial phase.  The IG expects to complete the guide by September 1, after which it will be submitted to a journal or published in open access.

Want to learn more? The Latin American Law Interest Group will give a brief presentation on the development of the research guide at the FCIL-SIS Jurisdictions IG Joint Meeting, to be held on Sunday, July 17, 2016, 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM, in the Hyatt-Water Tower Room. Presentation by Steven Alexandre da Costa (Boston University School of Law) and Juice Lee (Northeastern University School of Law.

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Roman Law – Translation, Images, Digital Projects and Visual Engagement!

By Marylin Raisch

At the upcoming AALL Annual Meeting, Professor Emeritus Timothy Kearley and digital projects consultant Angela Spinazzè will present a two-part program on creating exciting visual experiences in displaying special collections. First, Professor Kearley will describe the fascinating story of discovering manuscripts on Roman law and Latin translation of Justinian’s Code undertaken by Justice Fred Blume in the early 20th century. The orderliness of law concerned the ancient Romans and American codifiers, and an early taxonomy of law emerged. Then Angela Spinazzè, who has worked at the Art Institute of Chicago, will show beautiful visuals from her past projects for institutions in Chicago and Oxford that exemplify the best approach to creating functional and engaging virtual research experiences like the University of Wyoming’s unique online realization of Blume’s translation.

For those attending the conference, the location is the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Hyatt-Columbus EF at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, July 19th.

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FCIL-SIS Related Programming in Chicago, 2016

SATURDAY July 16, 2016

9:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Two Sides to the United Nations: Working with Public and Private International Law at the U.N. (IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law)

Coordinated by Thomas Mills, et al. and co-sponsored by the International Legal Research Interest Group (ILRIG) of ASIL and the FCIL-SIS. Two specialists, Susan Goard of the UN and Vikki Rogers, Director of the Institute for Int’l Commercial Law at Pace, will engage the audience in an intense full day workshop addressing the major functions of the UN, documentation of the main bodies and specialized agencies, the CISG and its application in international trade, and available UN related research platforms.

SUNDAY July 17, 2016

12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

FCIL-SIS Jurisdictions IG Joint Meeting (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, Indigenous Peoples, Customary & Religious Law, Roman Law) (Hyatt-Water Tower)

Meeting Topics:

  • Welcome and Intro (Susan Gualtier, Louisiana State University School of Law Library) – 5 minutes
  • European Law: Recent Developments in German Law Related to Asylum and Refugees: A Brief Overview for Law Librarians (Jennifer Alison, Harvard Law School Library) – 20 minutes
  • Latin America: Cuban Legal Research Guide (Julienne Grant, Loyola University Chicago Law Library, et al.) – 10 minutes
  • Africa: Updates of the Digitization Case Law Project from South Western Nigeria (Yemisi Dina, Osgood Hall Law School Library) – 20 minutes
  • Indigenous Peoples: Indigenous Peoples and DNA Testing: Friend or Foe? (Steven Perkins, Greenberg Traurig, LLP) – 20 minutes
  • Individual Interest Groups business meetings – 15 minutes

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Asian Legal Information in English: Availability, Accessibility, and Quality Control (Hyatt-Columbus EF)

Coordinated by Alex Zhang, participants will learn about resources, tools, and tips for finding existing official ENG translations of primary legal materials in major Asian jurisdictions, the speakers will address the pros and cons of ENG translations and how to discern when ENG translation is not readily available.

5:15 PM – 6:00 PM

FCIL-SIS Foreign Law Selectors IG (Hyatt-Comiskey)

Coordinated by Marci Hoffman.

6:00 PM – 6:45 PM

FCIL-SIS Standing Committees Joint Meeting (Publicity Committee, Internships & Exchanges Committee, and Electronic Research IG) (Hyatt-Field)

Meeting Topics:

  • Welcome and Introduction (Loren Turner) – 5 minutes
  • ERIG: ICRC Customary International Humanitarian Law Database (CIHL database) (Mr. Ismael Raboud, ICRC) – 15 minutes
  • ERIG: LOC Indigenous Law Portal (Steve Perkins, Library of Congress) – 15 minutes
  • Individual Standing Committees business meetings – 10 minutes

7:00 PM – who knows?

AALL Annual Meeting FCIL-SIS Reading Group (place TBD – stay in touch with Dan Wade at Daniel.wade@yale.edu)

Coordinated and lead by Dan Wade, the group will discuss East West Street: On the Origin of Genocide and “Crimes Against Humanity”

MONDAY July 18, 2016

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

FCIL-SIS Business Meeting and Breakfast (Sponsored by Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, Thomson Reuters, and Wolters Kluwer) (Hyatt Wrigley)

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign & International Legal Research IG (Hyatt-Michigan B)

Coordinated by Catherine Deane, this meeting will present three substantive presentations:

  • Marilyn Raisch (Georgetown University Law Center) will share her experience creating short videos to search databases using Jing
  • Alexis Fetzer (Richmond School of Law) will share her experience as a “non”-FCIL librarian proposing an FCIL research course
  • Nina E. Scholtz (Cornell Law School) will share her thoughts on teaching an experiential research course for international LLM students.

4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

FCIL-SIS Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarian Recipient’s Presentation – Rhenny Pulungan of Indonesia, currently at U. of Melbourne’s Law School Library will deliver a talk entitled The Legal Research Landscape in Indonesia: Limitations and Possibilities (Hyatt-Columbus GH)

5:45 PM – 6:45 PM

International Attendees Joint Reception (AALL/FCIL/IALL) (Hyatt-Crystal Ballroom C)

TUESDAY July 19, 2016

7:30 AM – 8:15 AM

FCIL-SIS Education Committee and 2017 Summit Task Force Joint Meeting (Hyatt-Skyway 265)

8:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Roman Law, Roman Order, and Restatements (Hyatt-Columbus EF)

Coordinated by Marylin J. Raisch, participants will learn about digitization of historical documentation, assess the role of Roman Law and codification’s impact on American legal taxonomies, explore the influence of Roman Law on Restatements.

9:45 AM – 10:45 AM

Poster #24: Are Self-Paced Pre-Recorded Modules Better than Live Instruction for Teaching Basic Legal research Concepts? (Exhibit Hall)

Created by Lucie Olejnikova and Jane Bahnson, this poster session will be on display starting Sunday, July 17, 2016 through Tuesday, July 19, 2016. During the scheduled TUE session, presenters will be available to answer questions. This poster features a study carried out in Duke’s LLM Legal Research and Writing Course intended to measure students’ information retention when subject material was delivered in traditional live in-class lecture as compared to when the same material is delivered via self-paced pre-recorded online module.

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Vanishing Online? Legal and Policy Implications for Libraries of the EU’s “Right to be Forgotten” (Hyatt-Columbus KL)

Coordinated by Michael G. Bernier, the attendees will be brought up to date on the status of data protection laws and their allocation outside the EU, understand the obligations under the “right to be forgotten” principle for libraries making personal info public, and consider the line between protection personal privacy against the public’s right to access data.

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Join the FCIL-SIS Electronic Research Interest Group!

Join the FCIL-SIS Electronic Research Interest Group! Make a valuable contribution to the profession and enhance your reputation!

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The Electronic Research Interest Group meets to discuss both the web presence of the group and also new developments in technology or databases.  (FCIL Newsletter 2011)  This year’s tasks will include updating some of the items on the FCIL website like Lyonette Louis Jacques & Mary Rumsey’s Jumpstart Your Foreign, Comparative, and International Research and increasing the number of contributions to the Teaching FCIL Syllabi and Course Material Database.  Some of our past efforts included:

  1. Exchanging information about FCIL-related commercial databases and other electronic resources;
  2. FCIL-related digitization projects;
  3. The revival of the FCIL blog, which became DipLawMatic Dialogues; and
  4. China’s RC Supreme People’s Court’s creation of a repository of their cases in English.

To volunteer contact James Hart at hartjw@uc.edu or 513-556-0160.