CAFLL-WestPac Recap: Continuing Education for Law Librarians and Demand-Driven Service Innovation in China

By Alex X. Zhang

CAFLLThis blog post highlights a panel discussion on two major and long-standing issues: continuing education for law librarians and demand-driven service innovation in law libraries. Both issues are important and deserve close attention in the law librarianship and legal information field. Michael Chiorazzi, Dean and Professor of Law at the Daniel Cracchiolo Law Library, University of Arizona Rogers College of Law, shared his insights on continuing education for law librarians. More specifically, he critiqued major formats and platforms that deliver continuing education content to users such as webinars, continuing education classes through colleges, workshops, networking events, etc. He emphasized the value of individual scholarship in continuing education and advocated for more sabbaticals for law librarians, claiming “they refresh and invigorate one’s enthusiasm for the profession.” He also shared his experience with managing the Law Library Fellowship program offered through the University of Arizona’s School of Information and experience teaching undergraduates legal research classes at the University of Arizona, which is the only law school in the United States that offers an undergraduate law degree. Continuing education is important in all professions and, needless to say, is necessary and essential for law librarians. Unfortunately, there has not been much discussion on what works and what does not work for the law librarians. Dean Chiorazzi’s talk challenged us to think more in depth of the topic, or in his own words, “how do we know what we need to know?”

Dr. Liu Ming, Associate Director of the Law Library of Renmin University of China, tackled an equally important problem in the law librarianship field, which is demand-driven service innovation in China. Dr. Liu Ming took a new angle and introduced us a new perspective looking at the issue that has otherwise been extensively discussed. She employed KANO theory to examine the user demands in Chinese Law Libraries and how Law Libraries in China have tried to meet user needs in three different levels. The KANO model was first introduced by Professor Noriaki Kano of Tokyo Rika University. The model was based on the valid assumption that customer needs are constantly changing and the question becomes how to meet patron’s ever-changing demands. Dr. Liu summarized demands of Chinese law library patrons under three levels: basic needs, performance and excitement demands. She argued that currently, most Chinese academic law libraries meet the basic needs of library patron, but need to further enhance the user satisfaction and promote the law libraries’ status as a legal information center as opposed to a place to collect and house books.

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