ASIL-ILA 2014 Wrap-Up

by Kristina Alayan

10168143_10101375365777866_2769768667846167479_nFor the first time since both the American Society of International Law (ASIL) and the International Law Association (ILA) were founded, the two organizations came together for an ambitious joint conference. The successful event took place April 7 – 12, 2014 at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, DC. Scholars, practitioners, judges, and students from around the world came to enjoy the outstanding programs and networking opportunities. Moreover, the timing of the conference coincided with the blooming of the famous DC cherry blossoms, which were out in full force. Conference participants who stayed through Saturday (and who were willing to brave the crowds) also enjoyed the Cherry Blossom Parade on Saturday, April 12 – the final weekend of the annual National Cherry Blossom Festival.

Speakers ranged from former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor to Radhika Coomaraswamy, former UN Special Representative of the Secretary General on Children and Armed Conflict on Violence against Women. Judges from the International Court of Justice were in attendance both as honorees and as panelists along with numerous distinguished and accomplished scholars and practitioners. For those who were unable to attend the conference or a particular panel, the program is available for download on the ASIL website. In addition, ASIL Cables continued to provide commentary on the programs and events that took place over the course of the conference. Volunteers ably reported on the 55 panels and ensured comprehensive coverage of the events in an effort to disseminate the content to a wider audience.

10151851_10101375380193976_2748864400896446422_nThe programming at the conference focused on various aspects of the effectiveness of international law. Though the theme was broad, the programs often focused on more discrete issues, ranging from the anticipated ramifications of the recent Kiobel decision to whether forced feeding in response to hunger strikes is a violation of the Prohibition of Torture and Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment. Lively discussions took place among panelists, and participation from the engaged attendees served to further these conversations during the Q&A sessions and often long after the programs had concluded.

The International Legal Research Interest Group (ILRIG) has continued to build upon the leadership of its founders with a current roster of dedicated and inspired law librarians from across the country. It’s hard to believe that the group was only recently founded in 2010. In a short amount of time, the group’s biannual newsletter, the International Legal Research Informer, has already been formally recognized by ASIL as a newsletter to follow, and the International Research Kiosk staffed by ILRIG volunteers continues to be a popular resource for attendees. For the second year, ILRIG has sponsored a successful and well attended program, which was described in an earlier DipLawMatic Dialogues post by Joan Policastri. One of the most recent developments spearheaded by the ILRIG leadership is an initiative to recognize important contributions in the area of providing and enhancing legal information resources in international law. This initiative is still in the developmental stages, but ILRIG members are looking forward to hearing more about the award. The current name under consideration is the Jus Gentium Research Award, though ILRIG members are welcome to offer additional suggestions. The hope is to be able to honor a recipient in time for the meeting next year. The ASIL conference is a unique opportunity to catch up with colleagues and welcome new attendees while enjoying stellar programming that addresses current (and often controversial) issues in international law. Time permitting, attendees can also enjoy some of the amazing sights found only in Washington, DC. We hope to see you at ASIL next year!

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